Program Review – K-Pop Party!

Posted & filed under Blog, Uncategorized, Youth & Teen.

This program started with an idea from one of our teen volunteers during a CAT (Council of Awesome T(w)eens) Meeting where kids can discuss programs that they would like to see in the library. Several teens are K Pop (Korean Pop) fanatics and had a wealth of information about the topic. They said that they could expose lots of younger kids (Grades 3-8) to new K Pop music that they had not yet heard about.

Execution:

Kids were able to see a list of K Pop Bands on the whiteboard when they walked in. This accomplished several goals. First, it ignited conversation about what bands they already listen to and which ones they liked the most. They were able to write down what band their favorite is, which allows them to immediately participate. By participating, everyone felt like they can contribute right away, which ultimately allows for more participation throughout the program as a whole.

Warm Up Activity

After the warm-up or initial activity to get kids to participate, they then went on to make keychains featuring K Pop images. They had lots of images from which to choose, which allowed kids to customize an image to their liking, as well as talk to each other about which image is best to choose and why.

Trivia!

The final activity was a K Pop bingo game. Our teen volunteer helped to run this portion of the program, which allowed her to share her extensive knowledge of the subject. It was a fun way for kids to discuss and learn information about a topic about which they were already passionate. Finally, throughout the program, kids listened to a customized playlist of K Pop music. Again, this was a way for our volunteers to showcase their knowledge, as well as allow kids to hear their favorite music, as well as learn about new artists and songs. The program ultimately empowered our teen volunteers, and was a good combination of meeting kids where they’re already at in regards to their interests, while also exposing kids to new ideas and fun music! Check out more K Pop materials at our library for more information and fun!

BTS: The Ultimate Fan Book – Malcolm Croft

BTS Army Handbook – Niki Smith

K Pop: Korea’s Musical Explosion – Stuart Kallen

BTS World: Original Soundtrack – BTS

Caldecott Club: Session #3

Posted & filed under Blog, Uncategorized, Youth & Teen.

Hi! I’m Miss Eti, one of the Youth & Teen Services librarians and I’m back with another recap of our latest Caldecott Club session. We had our third session on Thursday, November 7th and selected more books to send to our Voting Party. To refresh your memory, the Caldecott Award is the award for the most distinguished American picture book for children, given out each year by the Association for Library Service to Children. We talked about the Caldecott Award and considered what makes a good picture book. This week is Children’s Book Week, which is celebrating its 100th anniversary, so I received a couple posters created by award-winning author/illustrator Yuyi Morales to raffle off at the end of our program. 

I shared how grown-up committee members have boxes of books delivered at their doorsteps when they receive submissions for the award. So I taped up a box of our books & had F., one of our Caldecott Club members, help me open it up and then we distributed the books.

The books we discussed in session 3 were:


When Aidan Became a Brother by Kyle Lukof, illustrated by Kaylani Juanita

¡Vamos! Let’s Go to the Market by Raúl the Third, colors by Elaine Bay

At the Mountain’s Base by Traci Sorell, illustrated by Weshoyot Alvitre 

My Papi Has a Motorcycle by Isabel Quintero, illustrated by Zeke Peña

Here’s the necessary spoiler alert for all of these picture books.

Picture Walk

Rather than doing a formal read aloud of each book, we did picture walks. For the picture walk, we discussed each book’s visual features to examine the techniques the artists used and how they worked. Often I would prompt the group by asking them: How well does this book do what it’s trying to do? What did you notice? How does this page make you feel? What makes this art distinguished? I also found it very helpful to remind our group not to skip ahead in their copies of the book because we want to experience the often dramatic page turns in the picture walk together. 

This session I tried to use our timer, but it’s SO hard to stop talking about books when I can only give us 10 minutes per book. I realized I selected longer, more visually and thematically complex books this session, which are all perfect for amazing conversations, but I needed like 3 more hours for this program to dive in to each of them… In the end, I am learning to accept that I may not discuss every spread of each book in detail but hopefully can help kids experience these books in new ways. It felt like a success when K. asked if the books were able to be checked out after the program; it’s clear he still had lots more he wanted to explore. One of the best parts of doing a program series is that I get to make changes to improve the program each time. I revised our note-taking handout to include more space for kids to write down ideas and notes that we might not get to share during the discussion, which was very successful. It was also fascinating to see the doodles that the kids created during by this program. I also reorganized the room so that everyone was sitting in a row of tables facing me. Simply changing the design of the space can transform the program itself! 

I have to give a huge shout-out and thank you to Ms. Gaby, who joined this session, sharing her expertise and assistance, especially when dealing with tech issues, and generally being an awesome calming presence within the chaos I create. Thank you, Gaby!  

When Aidan Became a Brother by Kyle Lukof, illustrated by Kaylani Juanita

For this picture walk, I’m going to do something a little different since we discussed it during our Junior Justice League session in October, too, so I’m going to synthesize the discussion from these two programs. 

I began our discussion with a pre-reading question about what should we do if we have a new family member or a new friend in our class or neighborhood? K. suggested that “if you have a new family member, you should be nice to them.” S. shared that you should make sure it’s safe and they’re happy. M. added that you should be quiet. A. asserted that “I would ask them what they need so they feel more at home.” M. shared “if they’re a baby, you can treat them the way you would like.” C. shared how he smiled and said hi to welcome what became his oldest friend. E. shared how her siblings helped prepare for her before she was born, including building the crib. I then prompted the group to think about how do we show love to our family/friends no matter what before doing our picture walk. 

I began our discussion by asking how Aidan is feeling in the first spread, to which A. responded, “the parents don’t think the same way.” I then read the text of the page and we discussed how we know Aidan is not happy with the room. As we discussed the element of the room that didn’t work for Aidan, M. suggested that maybe Aidan feels “bored sad.” D. shared “he doesn’t like how he’s dressed.” 

I pointed out that we were going to seek out the rule of threes throughout the book as a narrative structure, looking at Aidan’s name, room, and clothing. This understanding of the story was informed by an interview with Kyle Lukoff who said, “So when I wrote that first page of AIDAN, I hit on three points: his name, his room, and his clothes. And those three points, in that order–name, room, clothes–show up consistently as Aidan is transitioning. Then when the baby enters the picture, the three points invert, and we learn about the baby’s clothes, room, and name, and then Aidan’s anxieties revolve around the clothes, room, and name, keeping that order intact. It’s something that readers might not notice consciously unless they’re looking for it, but is crucial for making the story feel like a picture book instead of a truncated short story.” When we moved onto the accidentally-on-purpose spread, K. pointed out that on the previous page, he thought Aidan felt lonely, “and in this page, he’s disappointed that he feels like he’s not himself.” And then on the next page, when Aidan cuts his hair, K. declared, “it looks like him.” We talked about how Aidan is feeling after his haircut. An. suggested that “he’s eager to see his parents’ faces, so they can realize something.” P. suggested that “he’s happy because he can be himself.” A. shared that “I think that Aidan felt trapped on the inside before and when he cut his hair, he feels like he’s free, flying like a bird.” This beautiful comment predicted the future painting spread perfectly. We talked about how his parents react to him telling them that he is a boy. Ya. suggested that “they feel proud and relieved – because he’s got bravery.” We talked about the importance of finding community.

The kids then noticed the rule of threes in the newly decorated room, his name and his clothing.  The kids pointed out his fantastic pink shoes! 

They then applied this same rule of three to his concerns about the new baby. We talked about Aidan’s concerns about being a big brother, knowing “a big brother was an important job for a boy like him. He wanted to make sure this boy would feel understood right away.” We noticed Aidan’s body language when people ask him and his parents about the baby’s gender and the way that makes him feel. Our group gasped with wonder when they saw Aidan and his dad painting the room for the new baby, and I made sure to refer back to A.’s comment about Aidan feeling like he’s flying. M. noticed the different shapes of the clouds, which provoked our entire group to shout out the things that they could see.

When Aidan is under his covers and tells his mom his worries, “I don’t want them to feel like I did when I was little, but what if I get everything wrong? What if I don’t know how to be a good big brother?” I stopped to ask the group what they would say to Aidan. Immediately, B. said, “Don’t worry, buddy,” trying to comfort Aidan. I wish I could have had time to hear everyone’s responses, but I know these kids were thinking deeply about ways to support Aidan. I shared Aidan’s mom’s beautiful response: “When you were born, we didn’t know you were going to be our son. We made some mistakes, but you helped us fix them…. And you taught us how important it is to love someone for exactly who they are. This baby is so lucky to have you and so are we.” I shared Kyle’s message from his interview on The Children’s Book Podcast with Matthew Winner for young people: “I want to tell them that they teach your parents and those around them to love them for who they are – and that we are so lucky to have them here.” I then shared the dramatic page turn when the baby is born and Aidan officially becomes a big brother. A. pointed out that the balloons say, “it’s a baby,” showing how the parents understand more. In their notes, Ya. wrote: “I like how he was proud and didn’t want the baby to go through what he was going through.” D. wrote: “I like the part when he cuts his hair. I like the art.”

¡Vamos! Let’s Go to the Market by Raúl the Third, Colored by Elaine Bay

I began our picture walk by sharing some background information about the author/illustrator, Raúl the Third. He said in a Let’s Talk Picture Books interview, “The idea was simply to introduce readers to the amazing part of the world that I grew up in. I was born and raised in the bordertowns of El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juarez, Mexico. Each book will celebrate a different part of the culture and location. The first book is about the Mercado because hands down the Mercado Cuauhtemoc in Juarez has been so influential in my life as an artist.” Later in the program, I was able to share pictures of the Mercado and discuss how this real place is depicted in this fictionalize world. I told the kids briefly about the collaborative process between Raúl and Elaine, which truly are a superteam. The colors and textures make this book come to life. I wish I could have spent more time discussing how Elaine Bay uses color. 

Interestingly, while the premise of this book is informed by Richard Scarry’s Busytown series, the kids were not familiar with his books. The kids were super excited to learn and speak the Spanish words, finding them throughout the book and figuring them out from the context clues. I told them about the glossary at the end, which is an excellent resource to share. “Another thing that makes a really good book is Easter eggs,” C. shared, expressing his understanding of the essence of this book with its dozens of simultaneous plots and characters. I told them that we couldn’t possibly notice everything in the 10-minutes or so we had to do our picture walk, so we were going to focus specifically on finding our  favorite luchador, El Toro, to which C. declared, “that means bull.” The kids were happy when they found the El Toro balloon, which is just a fantastic Easter egg. This really is the perfect book to share using a document camera where you can help point out all of the details. We could have literally spent the entire session just on this book!

The kids loved the twist at the end (spoiler alert again) when Little Lobo brings the golden laces for El Toro’s mask and ends up meeting his hero, having his comic signed, and giving him a ride home. E. had a question about the difference between vamos and vámonos. Ms. Gaby shared her expertise and provided a lesson about the difference between vamos and vámonos. She shared that vamos means go! and vámonos means let’s go. This was a great opportunity for all of us to learn more Spanish! C. declared that this book was all caps awesome. S. shared that “I like when he lost his mask.” D. shared that, “I like it a lot. I like when he finds his mask.” I was so happy to share that there’s going to be a franchise of Vamos books, which include: Vamos! Let’s Go Eat! (spring 2020), El Toro and Friends: Training Day, Tag Team (both spring 2021), and Team Up (spring 2022), board books featuring Coco Rocho, who the kids loved, and ¡Vamos! Let’s Cross the Bridge (scheduled for fall 2021). 

At the Mountain’s Base by Traci Sorell, illustrated by Weshoyot Alvitre

I will never forget the incredible discussions we had during last year’s Caldecott Club when we discussed We are Grateful: Otsaliheliga by Traci Sorell, illustrated by Frané Lessac. I knew that her latest book would spark powerful discussions – and I was right! I began our discussion by sharing background information about the creators of At the Mountain’s Base, telling the kids that Traci Sorell is an enrolled citizen of the Cherokee Nation and Weshoyot Alvitre is Tongva (Los Angeles Basin) – so they are both Native women creating books today. When asked about the origins of this book, Traci shared in a Cynsations interview that “At the Mountain’s Base centers on a family waiting for their relative, a female pilot, to come home from war. I wanted to highlight the service of Native American women, which is all too often forgotten or left out of history books altogether.” We began our analysis with the endpapers, discussing the kids’ impressions of the art. I shared what I learned from the fantastic Meet Penguin’s Premier Picture Book Creators webinar where Weshoyot Alvitre shared her process of researching and creating At the Mountain’s Base. (I highly recommend watching this webinar to hear directly from Weshoyot about her creative process and inspiration.) I shared how she did research about the Cherokee practice of finger weaving and paid tribute to it in the art. I shared the dedications from the book: Traci Sorell wrote, “For Native veterans, those in active duty, their loved ones and the Native Nations they all come from – ᏩᏙ (wado) thank you.” Weshoyot Alvitre wrote, “To my grandmother Vera and my mom, who wove a deep love for creating with my hands when I was very young.” These dedications helped center the real life people who inspired this beautiful picture book.  The group really noticed how this picture book is a poem, paying attention to the beautiful, minimalist language. I pointed out how Weshoyot’s craft as a comic book artist is reflected in the art, using sequential panels that zoom into scenes like a film.

The group noticed how the panels are made from woven yarn that flow past the end of the pages. I made sure to point out the dramatic page turn when the perspective shifts and we’re looking down at the grandmother weaving with the text beside her “and worrying.” Some of the kids suggested that the child with the grandmother was the author, Traci Sorell, gaining knowledge from her Elder. I shared how Weshoyot wanted to “honor her grandmother [Vera].. who always had her hands busy doing something,” who taught her knitting  and help develop Weshoyot’s love of fiber craft, along with her mother.

When the narrative shows how the Cherokee family is waiting for their loved one to return, I shared that this book is inspired by the real story of Ola Mildred “Millie” Rexcoat, an Oglala Lakota pilot, which I made sure to read to the kids. 

I showed how photographs of Millie informed the art. I even shared pictures from the dedication of friends and family honoring Millie, along with photographs of Millie. 

Our group was super engaged by the full page spread of the pilot in her plane, provoked to make the sounds of planes as we discussed it. I love how visual art can provoke an auditory experience! But then their planes had to come in for a landing so we could continue our discussion.

We discussed the emotions that we thought the family was feeling as they held each other. We then did a dramatic page turn for the final page when the pilot is heading toward the cabin and all comes full circle. The kids oohed and ahhed over the case cover secret in a gorgeous finger weaving pattern. One kid asked if it felt like weaving so we had to try it to find out.  One of our new Caldecott Club friends, D., identified the spine and the jacket in this moment, showing her incredible knowledge of the parts of books. 

I shared how one of our Caldecott Club friends, Yu., couldn’t come to the program because she was doing a Veteran’s Day activity, but once I told her about this book, she asked for a copy to share with her teacher. And as an amazing surprise, she dropped by during Caldecott Club to tell us that she had shared the book with her social studies teacher, who read it to the class. Caldecott Club connections for the win! 

My Papi Has a Motorcycle by Isabel Quintero, illustrated by Zeke Peña

As soon as I said the title of this book, one of our friends, S. said that her own dad has a motorcycle, making a wonderful text-to-self connection. Others shared their own motorcycle connections. Ms. Gaby shared that Corona means crown, which really enhanced our understanding of this book. I began our discussion by sharing some background information about Corona’s 1913 Road Race and agricultural workers fighting for their rights, pointing out the murals when Daisy Ramona passed them.

I told the kids we were going to go like a motorcycle through this book since we were running out of time, a perennial issue for me, which of course, provoked the kids to make motorcycle vroom noises. (I had no idea that these books would inspire such visceral, multi-sensory responses. Audiobook producers, take note when you adapt all of these books and make sure to include these sounds. I think all of these books would make exceptional readalong audiobooks!) We began our journey with a spot of intertextuality, noting the delightful cameo of Lowriders in Space by Cathy Camper and Raúl the Third. C.’s immediately wanted to know if there was Spanish in Lowriders, to which I gave an emphatic yes.

We zoomed ahead in our picture walk, pointing out how Daisy feels like she’s a comet, surrounded by sunset colors. My Papi Has a Motorcycle is another book that calls readers to pay attention to all the details, discovering something new each time you read it. Our group noticed the unicorn on her helmet and the one that rides a motorcycle too. When Daisy and her dad encounter the shuttered Don Rudy’s raspado shop, we discussed how they thought Daisy and her dad must be feeling – and how the city has changed, which then provoked them to think about the ways their own community has changed.

I concluded our discussion by sharing Isabel Quintero’s author note: “Who are the people who build our cities and form our communities? Who are the people who get streets named after them, and who are the people who lay the asphalt? …. This book is a love letter to both my father, who showed me different ways of experiencing home, and to Corona, California, a city that will always be a part of me.”

Voting

After we had walked through each book in a whirlwind of color and conversation, we were ready to ballot. Each child received a paper ballot to select their top 2 choices. The top books then are the winners of our session and go on the Voting Party on January 9. We also had a raffle to give away two Children’s Book Week posters designed by Yuyi Morales. Everyone got a pin to add to their lanyard and a Caldecott poster. 

Since we had a tie between some of our books, we now have 3 books from this session going to the party… And the Session 3 Winners Are…

When Aidan Became a Brother by Kyle Lukof, illustrated by Kaylani Juanita

At the Mountain’s Base by Traci Sorell, illustrated by Weshoyot Alvitre 

My Papi Has a Motorcycle by Isabel Quintero, illustrated by Zeke Peña

Join Us Next Time!

Please join us for our next Caldecott Club session on Thursday, November 21 from 3:30-5:00pm! And don’t forget to bring your fancy lanyards! (And if you didn’t get one, make sure to join us so you can rock our Caldecott Club merch!) While our registration list is full online, PLEASE contact me to get put on the list. I’d love to have you join us.

Since you’ve spent all this time reading this post, I’ll even let you know which books we’ll be discussing:

A Big Bed for Little Snow by Grace Lin 

Saturday by Oge Mora 

Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story by Kevin Noble Maillard, illustrated by Juana Martinez-Neal

Going Down Home with Daddy by Kelly Starling Lyons, illustrated by Daniel Minter

Thanks for sticking all the way through this post… Hope to see you next time!

 – Eti

Resources

A librarian always provides their sources – here are a series of resources I found while preparing for this program that you may want to check out:

When Aidan Became a Brother by Kyle Lukoff, illustrated by Kaylani Juanita

Kirkus (Starred) https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/kyle-lukoff/when-aidan-became-a-brother/

Publisher’s Weekly (Starred): https://www.publishersweekly.com/978-1-62014-837-2 

Booklist (Starred): https://www.booklistonline.com/When-Aidan-Became-a-Brother/pid=9718914 

Horn Book (Starred): https://www.hbook.com/?detailStory=review-of-when-aidan-became-a-brother

School Library Journal (Starred) https://www.slj.com/?reviewDetail=when-aidan-became-a-brother

Calling Caldecott Post (Hillary Saxton)

Webinar: LGBTQ+ Children’s Books from Lee & Low 

Kirkus Interview with Kyle Lukoff 

All in the Family by Julie Danielson 

Teacher’s Guide 

When Kyle wrote Aidan: Process and the Trans Child Narrative (Betsy Bird) 

Staff Picks: When Aidan Became a Brother

The Children’s Book Podcast with Matthew Winner Interview with Kyle Lukoff 

When life is hard and art is the way out with illustrator Kaylani Juanita (Creativity Project) 

Lee & Low Publisher’s Page

Five Questions for Kyle Lukoff (Horn Book) 

Kaylani Juanita’s website

Kyle Lukoff’s website 

Picture book of the day: When Aidan Became a Brother bubbles with joy and love (Mr. Brian’s Picture Books)

Shelf Awareness review 

¡Vamos! Let’s Go to the Market by Raúl the Third and Elaine Bay 

Raúl the Third’s website 

Get to know Raúl the Third (Jarrett Lerner)

A Daily Dose Of Delight review (Margaret M. Myers-Culver’s Librarian’s Quest)

Publisher’s website 

Five questions for Raúl the Third (Horn Book) 

Let’s Talk Illustrators #103: Raúl the Third

Raúl the Third Interview (Bartography)

Latinx in Kidlit Review 

¡Vamos! Let’s Make It a Franchise! by Sue Corbett 

¡Vamos! Let’s Go to the Market Review (De Colores: The Raza Experience in Books for Children)

School Library Journal Review 

At the Mountain’s Base by Traci Sorell, illustrated by Weshoyot Alvitre 

Traci Sorell’s Website

Weshoyot Alvitre’s Website 

‘At the Mountain’s Base’ honors Native women’s military service by Will Chavez (Cherokee Phoenix) 

Native Vision: Weshoyot Alvitre on Illustrating At The Mountain’s Base Interview by Kim Rogers (Cynsations)

Booklist Webinar—Meet Penguin’s Premier Picture Book Creators!

What I Did Last Week, Featuring Weshoyot Alvitre and Duncan Tonatiuh (Julie Danielson)

At the Mountain’s Base: Book Activity 

Publisher’s Page 

Horn Book Review 

Weaving Words and Worlds on the Page: An Interview with Traci Sorell & Weshoyot Alvitre (CBC Diversity)

Highly Recommended: AT THE MOUNTAIN’S BASE by Traci Sorell, illustrated by Weshoyot Alvitre (American Indian’s in Children’s Literature – Dr. Debbie Reese)

Ellsworth Airfield Ops building renamed in honor of fallen WASP

Native Voice: Traci Sorell on At the Mountain’s Base & Indian No More Interview by Kim Rogers (Cynsations)

Weaving Hope (Margaret M. Myers-Culver’s Librarian’s Quest)

My Papi Has a Motorcycle by Isabel Quintero, illustrated by Zeke Peña

Isabel Quintero’s Website

Zeke Peña’s Website 

All in the Family by Julie Danielson 

Review of the Day: My Papi Has a Motorcycle by Isabel Quintero, ill. Zeke Peña (Betsy Bird) 

Horn Book Review 

Publisher’s Website 

Children’s Book Podcast with Matthew Winner Interview with Isabel Quintero &  Zeke Peña

My Papi Has A Motorcycle, Libro Compañero by Yuyi Morales video 

‘My Papi Has A Motorcycle’ Pays Loving Tribute To A California Childhood (NPR Weekend Edition) 

Celebrate Family, Community and the Thrill of the Ride with My Papi Has a Motorcycle by Erika Thulin Dawes (Classroom Bookshelf) 

Q & A with Isabel Quintero and Zeke Peña by Antonia Saxon (Publisher’s Weekly) 

Let’s Talk Illustrators #107: Zeke Peña (Let’s Talk Picture Books) 

Calling Caldecott Post by Luisana Duarte Armendáriz

History of Corona

Book Review (Suzanne Mateus)


Program Review: Slime Science

Posted & filed under Blog, Youth & Teen.

Description: Our Slime Science programs are one of our most popular in the library. We have made gallons of slime over the past year, and kids can’t seem to get enough of it. We run two different levels of slim programs.

The first one is Slime Science Jr., which is for Kindergarten through Second Grade with a caregiver. The purpose of this program is to introduce caregivers and kids about the basics of creating, perfecting, and troubleshooting slime. What do you do if it’s too watery? If it’s too stiff? What if it’s not changing colors or too clumpy? This is a crash course in the basics of slime.

Also, this program can be beneficial for the caregivers as well, as they can use this as a foundation to understand the recipe and way to create slime successfully. We go through the “why” along with the “how” for every step, as well as basic creation and cleanliness tips along the way.

The second type of program is our regular after-school Slime Science, for kids in grades 3-8. This focuses on the same thing as Slime Science Jr., but with the opportunity to make more complicated types of slime, with different sensory materials, experimenting with different ingredients (including elements such as coffee grounds and chocolate). Recently, kids have made glow in the dark slime, cloud slime, and dirt/nature slime! This gives kids variety while keeping the foundation of making slime the same. Of course, we allow kids to experiment and play with their slime as they create it and when they are finished! Check out the recipe for making your own slime at home and stay tuned for new types of in the future!

Recipe:

Plastic cup

Less than 1oz water for stirring

2:1 or 3:1 ratio of glue to water

Add small amounts of food coloring for color

Begin with 1 cupful of Sta-Flo. Can add small amounts more if needed

Stir all ingredients

To increase texture: lotion

To increase fluffiness: shaving cream

If too watery: small amounts of baking soda

Caldecott Club: Session #2

Posted & filed under Blog, Uncategorized, Youth & Teen.

Hi! I’m Miss Eti, one of the Youth & Teen Services librarians and I’m back with another recap of our latest Caldecott Club session. We had our second session on Thursday, October 17 and selected two more books to send to our Voting Party. To refresh your memory, the Caldecott Award is the award for the most distinguished American picture book for children, given out each year by the Association for Library Service to Children. We talked about the Caldecott Award, spotting titles we’ve enjoyed from the Baker & Taylor poster and considering what makes a good picture book. We were also joined by our friend Beekle, star of the 2015 Caldecott Award winning book, The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend by Dan Santat. 

I shared how grown-up committee members have boxes of books delivered at their doorsteps when they receive submissions for the award. So I taped a box up a box of our books & had two of our Caldecott Club members help us open it up and then distribute the books. 

The books we discussed in session 2 were:

Bear Came Along by Richard T. Morris, illustrated by LeUyen Pham 

A Stone Sat Still by Brendan Wenzel 

Another by Christian Robinson

Music for Mister Moon by Philip and Erin Stead 

Picture Walk

Rather than doing a formal read aloud of each book, we did picture walks. Our participants were especially eager to help out with reading each book aloud, so we worked out a system to take turns. For the picture walk, we discussed each book’s visual features to examine the techniques the artists used and how they worked. Often I would prompt the group by asking them: How well does this book do what it’s trying to do? What did you notice? How does this page make you feel? What makes this art distinguished? I also found it very helpful to remind our group not to skip ahead in their copies of the book because we want to experience the page turns in the picture walk together. 

One thing that I failed to do this session was use our timer to ensure we gave each book equal time – and keep us on track to complete this program on time. When you’re focused on discussing a book, time seems to stand still, but using a timer ensures that we temper our enthusiasm with reality.

Ms. Ann was instrumental in ensuring our program today ran smoothly so I want to make sure to share a huge thank you to her! 

Bear Came Along by Richard T. Morris, illustrated by LeUyen Pham 

We began our picture walk by making predictions based on the cover, which is pretty mysterious and also a wonderful #bookface opportunity. E. shared that “maybe the bear was sad… and something came along and and cheered him up.” B. added his prediction that “he lost his family and another animal pack, say a wolf, and that was his family.” Their predictions bore out in the story. We then turned our attention to the endpapers, to which E. revealed to us that “it was grey and black and then there’s this blue,” noticing the subdued color palette in the beginning of the book. We used our close reading skills to notice how the log next to the bear was cracking and set our expectations for bear’s dramatic fall into the river. Bear’s travails in the river led our group to talk about safety while camping by rivers and how to deal with getting sucked away by the current. Each page turn in this book IS a dramatic page turn and we had the best time amplifying that drama. When it was revealed that Froggy was looking for a friend, B. proudly proclaimed, “I was right! He’s finding his people.”

R. got super excited when he noticed the frog in the bushes way before he appears to Bear. The kids excitedly started noticing a pattern where the upcoming animal is in the prior spread, looking deeply at each page for the reveal. B. got very excited when he found turtles on the endpages, proclaiming, “if you don’t like turtles, don’t talk to me.” As we noticed the colors in the story, B. predicted, “every page you turn, another color will show up.” E. added to the analysis, sharing, “every time an animal joins in, it’s a different color [added to the page].” We talked about how perspective shifts throughout the story, from a bird’s eye view to a close-up of all the animals to a very zoomed out view of their entire trip. E. was able to read the animal’s body language and expressions to share how each animal was feeling. Our group automatically made the same faces as the animals, which is part of what makes this book storytime gold!

I relate deeply to the turtles throughout this book.

Ms. Ann noticed how the places they’ve been have a lot of color but the places they haven’t been don’t.  E. added to this insight, saying, “You get more colorful, the more adventures you make.” We experienced the switch in the physical orientation of the book when they’re falling down the waterfall as an effective way to show change. Our group was excited to see the other animals in the final scene who are drawn into this adventure. They also noticed how the final endpapers are so colorful, contrasting with the beginning muted endpapers. I shared selections from the author’s note from Richard T. Morris: “Sometimes the hardest thing is to embrace the other, when the other is so different. But it is through this connection that we truly discover our best selves – our strengths, our weaknesses, our fears, our courage.” I also shared the artist’s note from LeUyen Pham: “While painting this book, I spent a lot of time thinking about why people become divided from one another and forget that they all live on the same earth. It takes a small thing, like animals in a forest falling in a river, to realize this. We sink or swim together.. And sometimes we take a tumble and things turn out right…. A small metaphor that reminds us that the things that bind us are greater than things that divide us, and that while we are each distinct from one another, with quirks that make us so unique, we’re all journeying down the same river together.” 

Finally, I shared the case cover secret with our community of new friends having a great time together. 

A Stone Sat Still by Brendan Wenzel 

We began our picture walk by exploring the endpapers, making connections between the textured image to sidewalks, granite, flooring, and other stone. We looked at the cover page and encouraging the group to watch for the snail. The group noticed cracks on the side of the stone, which I had never noticed before. B. had some ideas about a creature, perhaps a snail, coming out from inside the stone. E. predicted that the bird was using his voice to wake the snail, which is part of why the stone was loud – and then when the stone was quiet, she suggested that the snail was frightened by the snake, so much that “he couldn’t even speak.” When the stone is rough, E. suggested that it was the snail who was taking off his shell. When the stone was soft, B. shared how porcupines could be soft, which helped us think more critically about how we view porcupines. Y. revealed how in the color spread represents the stone in different seasons. E. noticed a woodland creature underneath the moose hiding away, which just shows her attention to detail. I made sure to share this instagram video that shows Brendan Wenzel’s process to create the moose.

We talked about the theme of the stone being a home to all of these animals. We slowed down to notice how the stone becomes an island and is submerged underwater. We also pointed out how the spread without the stone is completely wordless and what that might mean. When we talked about the animals that are no longer there, E. shared that “they abandoned their habitat.” B. added “because they would die if they were there.” I deliberately tried to draw out the kids’ ideas about what is happening to the rock based on this interview with Brendan Wenzel who said, “The rock in the book is exposed at low tide, and the tide does rise. So it could be tidal movement. I’m leaving the source of the water rising a little ambiguous so that readers are free to wonder and to build their own story. That space is really important to build into books.” B. pointed out that the owl was still there, flying above the water, which is such a lovely insight. The spread about “have you ever known such a place?” provoked us to consider how we’d like to find places like this stone. We then revealed the case cover secret with the snail’s travels across the book, to which E. declared, “it’s kind of like a maze.” 

Another by Christian Robinson

We had to begin our journey to dimensions unknown with Christian Robinson’s gorgeous endpapers and predict what this book is about. E. shared it’s about space or having a dream about space. I directed them to look at the jacket copy at the back and front, showing the cats going in and out of the portals. 

When we saw the dramatic change between the quiet sleeping scene to the portal cat appearing, R. made a text-to-text connection, declaring it a “flip-o-rama,” a wonderful storytelling experience from Dav Pilkey’s Captain Underpants and Dog Man books. And then the group, of course, had to flip-o-rama these two pages! R. and B. then wanted to name the cats, which is, of course, what this book inspires kids to do! The kids got super excited when making predictions about the blue cat (portal cat) taking the toy and stealing away into the portal. Y. predicted that when the cat goes through the portal, the girl will join it. 

What would you name the cats?

When she goes into the portal, the orientation of the book shifts, so we physically turned the book upside down to follow her. It’s a bit confusing to move forward the opposite way, but it just takes practice to explore mirror worlds – and this process is what play is all about. (This New York Times Books Live video with Christian Robinson was instrumental to learning how to share this book and is just a wonderful viewing experience!)

Our group basically ooh and aahed throughout our picture walk. They noticed that the girl used her blanket to climb down into the portal. We continually changed the orientation, this time vertically as she climbs the stairs, as we moved forward in the story. E. shared that previously the cat was sad, but now it’s happy, playing with the other cat. Y. shared how the mirror cat is playing with them and leading them away. We thought critically about the rules of gravity in this world but also accepted that gravity was everywhere so you wouldn’t fall off the conveyor belt. Our group noticed the mirror pairs in the crowd scene, as well as ones that didn’t have pairs until the following spreads. We talked about how everyone is finding their people in these spreads. In my research for this book, I found this quote from Christian Robinson’s BookRiot interview explaining his process for creating Another: “Children seeing themselves reflected on the page was the spark that motivated the story. The thought that followed was well, what if a child literally saw themselves in a story? Perhaps a version of themselves from some parallel universe. As a child, I loved stories in which characters go on some magical adventure to a world where anything is possible. Often, those characters didn’t look like me or come from a community that reflected my own. I want kids today to have a different experience.”

Y. noticed how the girl has a red planet on her outfit like her cat’s collar and the mirror twin has a blue planet like her cat’s collar. We talked about the dramatic crossing of the gutter when the mouse is returned to our hero. When she returns home and is happily asleep, the kids noticed that there’s now a blue mouse on her floor, beckoning another future adventure. Y. declared that she liked this book. We also made sure to check out the case cover secret, which the kids thought looked like the ball pit scene. 

Music for Mister Moon by Philip and Erin Stead 

I began this book by talking about how this book is quieter, a book about an introvert – made by introverts. I shared Erin Stead’s process for creating the art, showing how it was all hand-drawn and painted. (There’s tons of resources below that reveal her incredible artistic process! I really would love to see how her art is made in real life to truly understand it.) We made some connections between this story and Where the Wild Things Are, talking about the power of imagination, not to mention the white space. We made connections between Another related to being  problem solvers when Hank gets a ladder to help Mister Moon.

I made sure the group looked back to pay attention to her stuffed bear and walrus to help them connect to her adventures to help Mister Moon. Hank is all about helping the moon fulfill his wishes. We noticed the double-page spreads and the impact of these scenes. I pointed out the spot colors on each of the characters who Hank visits to help return Mister Moon to the sky. We made sure to do a dramatic page turn when Mister Moon, with the help of the entire community, is returned to the sky. I also made sure to point out the super subtle, gentle case cover secret, which so fits this lovely, shy book. 

VOTING!

After we had walked through each book in a whirlwind of color and conversation, we were ready to ballot. Each child received a paper ballot to select their top 2 choices. M. helped with the math to make sure it was accurate. The top 2 books then are the winners of our session and go on the Voting Party on January 9. We also had a raffle where we gave away two Another pins and everyone got a pin to add to their lanyard and a Caldecott poster. 

And the Session 2 Winners Are…

Bear Came Along by Richard T. Morris, illustrated by LeUyen Pham 

Another by Christian Robinson

Join Us Next Time!

Please join us for our next Caldecott Club session on Thursday, November 7 from 3:30-5:00pm! And don’t forget to bring your fancy lanyards! (And if you didn’t get one, make sure to join us so you can rock our Caldecott Club merch!) While our registration list is full online, PLEASE contact me to get put on the list. I’d love to have you join us.

Since you’ve spent all this time reading this post, I’ll even let you know which books we’ll be discussing:

When Aidan Became a Brother by Kyle Lukof, illustrated by Kaylani Juanita

¡Vamos! Let’s Go to the Market by Raúl the Third

My Papi Has a Motorcycle by Isabel Quintero, illustrated by Zeke Peña

At the Mountain’s Base by Traci Sorell, illustrated by Weshoyot Alvitre 

Thanks for sticking all the way through this post… hope to see you next time!

 – Eti

Resources

A librarian always provides their sources – here are a series of resources I found while preparing for this program that you may want to check out:

Bear Came Along by Richard T. Morris, illustrated by LeUyen Pham 

Illustrator’s Website

Review from Librarian’s Quest 

Storytime with Bill – Read Aloud Video 

Horn Book Review (Julie Danielson) 

Book Chat: LeUyen Pham on Bear Came Along (Betsy Bird) 

Book Chat with the Illustrator: LeUyen Pham: Bear Came Along Video 

Publisher’s page

Bear Came Along Storytime Kit

LeUyen Pham Interview on The Children’s Book Podcast with Matthew Winner

Children’s Book Art: Techniques and Media 

A Stone Sat Still by Brendan Wenzel 

Author’s Website

Q & A with Brendan Wenzel by Antonia Saxon (Publisher’s Weekly) 

The Story Behind A Stone Sat Still (Video) 

Book Trailer (Video)

Publisher’s Page 

Ponder Perspectives and the Passage of Time with Brenden Wenzel’s A Stone Sat Still by Erika Thulin Dawes (School Library Journal’s Classroom Bookshelf) 

Instagram Process Video 

Ronnie’s Awesome List Podcast Interview with Brendan Wenzel 

Bothin Marsh StoryWalk – A Stone Sat Still

StoryWalk Article (Floating Times)

Another by Christian Robinson

Author’s Website 

New York Times Books: Live Illustration with Christian Robinson 

Publisher’s Page 

Educator’s Guide and Activities 

An Interview with Award-Winning Children’s Book Illustrator Christian Robinson by Jen Sherman (Book Riot) 

Book Trailer 

PBS Brief but Spectacular: Christian Robinson

The Bookshelf: Inside Illustrator Christian Robinson’s Sacramento Studio

Kirkus Review 

Christian Robinson’s Another (Julie Danielson) 

100 Scope Notes Review 

The Children’s Book Podcast with Matthew Winner

Music for Mister Moon by Philip and Erin Stead 

Publisher’s Page 

Behind the Scenes: ‘Music for Mister Moon’

Music for Mister Moon Website 

Music for Mister Moon (Julie Danielson) 

BookPage: Imaginative adventure stories perfect for bedtime reading (Julie Danielson) 

Kirkus Review 

Shelf Awareness Interview


Program Recap: T(w)eens’ Speak: Middle School and High School Info Panel

Posted & filed under Blog, Youth & Teen.

For this program, we wanted to have the kids take control of the program and ultimately get out of it what they want. We know that entering middle or high school can be challenging and that there are a lot of questions. We also know that having a supportive community can make that transition easier, and the Lincolnwood Public Library strives to create that community and offer support.

Execution: We started the program with an icebreaker that got kids talking to each other as well as learning a little bit more about what they experienced. Although kids were hesitant, it did allow them to start talking.

We then had kids talk about and answer previously submitted questions (we had a place to submit for several weeks in the library that were then vetted by the staff). Our t(w)een volunteers helped to guide the discussion, and because many of them were older, could offer more experience. Since the teens were all still in school, they gave a modern perspective as opposed to our staff. Staff were there just to guide the conversation and transition from one question to another.

Results: Kids were able to express themselves in most all of the questions. Kids going into Middle or High School were able to learn a lot of practical advice and stories from older kids about the school experience, as well as some things to look out for since most kids were in the same school system.

Most importantly, kids were able to have a community of others to provide support in a safe space. That’s the ideal support that the library can offer.

Options for Next Time:  Time is always a limiting factor. It would be great for kids to ask their own questions in addition to ones that were submitted. It would also be great if the entire program could be run by the teens themselves. This can easily be adapted in the future to a more general dealing with life program.

Stay tuned and enjoy the additional reading options for more on this topic!

Additional Resources on Back to School and Dealing with Difficult Topics in School:

School Made Easier by Wendy Moss

Superbrain by Toronto Public Library

Surviving Middle School by Luke Reynolds

The Pregnancy Project by Gaby Rodriguez

Ignite Your Spark by Patricia Wooster

Unbroken by Various

Our Stories, Our Voices by Various

Black Enough by Various

Summer Program Reviews

Posted & filed under Blog, Youth & Teen.

We’ve asked some of our patrons to give feedback on our programs. Check out one review of our Stranger Things Escape Room and Harry Potter Fandom Celebration. We appreciate the feedback and it gives a patron’s perspective on our programs. Also take a look at the links below to check out more Stanger Things materials that you may not know the library has. Enjoy!

Summer Program Reviews

Stranger Things: Suspicious Minds

Stranger Things: Darkness at the Edge of Town

Runaway Max

Dog Man Book Release Party

Posted & filed under Blog, Youth & Teen.

It started in Lego Club in April. I was chatting with a group of kids about their reading lives and they expressed their interest in us hosting a program about Dog Man by Dav Pilkey. I checked the upcoming releases list and discovered that the latest book, Dog Man: For Whom the Ball Rolls, would be published in August and our plans were hatched. On August 16, we hosted our highly-anticipated Dog Man Book Release Party and it was just as fun as we hoped it would be!

We began our program by having a photo opp with the super fancy Dog Man cardboard standee, enabling the kids to be in a picture with the Dog Man superhero personas. We started our program by making movies! We gathered copies of the Dog Man series, along with three copies of the new book to raffle away at the program, for the kids to hold. We then made a joyous “happy book birthday” video for Dav Pilkey, which was shared on our social media accounts. It made my day when I saw that Dav Pilkey saw our fan video, liked it & commented on it. We also made a thank-you video for Lizette Serrano, the Executive Director of Educational Marketing at Scholastic, who had generously provided us with giveaways for this program and is a dedicated advocate for libraries. She is the absolute best! 

We were then ready to jump into our celebration of the latest Dog Man book. We watched the action-packed trailer, which you can watch below.

We also watched a fascinating video with Dav Pilkey sharing the origins of Dog Man and his struggles with school. Some kids shared details that they knew from reading the author’s notes in the back of the Captain Underpants series. They were impressed that the idea for Dog Man came to him in 2nd grade! One young person shared that his differences became his superpowers.

It was now time for our Dog Man Storytime, where we hosted a reader’s theater performance of the first chapter of the new Dog Man. We asked kids to play different characters – and the entire group was responsible for the sound effects and group parts.  Ann, our Early Literacy Librarian, led this fun activity, reading the narration dramatically and hilariously and signaling everyone when it was their part. 

But then… disaster struck when Dog Man and Petey were cloned throughout the room and it was up to our intrepid fans to find them. Our group divided up between the two rooms with their clone scavenger hunt sheets in hand. Their job was to find all of the clones by their numbers. (Dog Man + math, for the win!) Many kids pointed out that they really enjoyed this part of the program on the evaluations. One awesome kid proudly proclaimed that he had found all the Petey clones, so when others had trouble, he kindly helped them find the ones they were missing. When people completed the scavenger hunt, they handed in their sheets to get a post-it for our Supa-Epic raffle. You can host your own clone scavenger hunt at home using the materials here.

We were then ready for our requested craft: Flip-O-Rama. We had tables full of art supplies, flip-o-rama templates, post-it flipbooks, and flip book templates to color. We put diagrams of how to draw the characters on the board, along with some flip-o-rama examples. Kids could participate in whatever way they felt comfortable. It was powerful seeing kids create art and be creative in their individual ways. 

Our group was then given the opportunity to join Dav Pilkey in his Do Good campaign to make a positive impact in their community. Knowing our kids’ passion for animals, I knew the perfect way to Do Good together. Everyone enthusiastically accepted the challenge to create dog toys to donate to shelter dogs. As promised, you can learn how to make the dog toys by following the video below. You can also stop at the library at any time and I’d be happy to teach you how to make dog toys. And when you’re done with your toy, drop it off at the library, so we can share it with the shelter dog who will love it! 

We then had everyone fill out an evaluation since we always want feedback about how our programs went and how we can improve. And everyone who completed a survey got a Dog Man swag bag, thanks to Lizette from Scholastic! 

Thank you, Lizette, for this amazing swag
to share with our Dog Man fans!

We also raffled off three copies Dog Man: For Whom the Ball Rolls and a MerryMakers Dog Man stuffed animal that both Ann and I had a hard time parting with… but we’re super happy that they’ve all found good homes. And don’t worry if you didn’t get a copy of Dog Man. You can always put a copy on hold at our library here

I am so grateful for the help of Supa Buddies, Ann, Emily, & Matt who helped out during this program, ensuring everything ran smoothly and getting some amazing videos and pictures to capture this memorable event. 

If you couldn’t make it to our Dog Man party, you can still get a Dog Man swag bag while supplies last. Just ask for one at the Youth and Teen Services desk – and take the Do Good challenge. And you can always print out Dog Man activities from Scholastic!

But, wait, there’s more! I learned from a caregiver at this program that Dog Man: The Musical is coming to town in March 2020 at the North Shore Center for the Performing Arts!

But now I know you’re facing a quandary: your young reader has read ALL of the Dog Man books and is hungry for more hilarious, engaging, and fun books to explore! Check out these Dog Man Readalikes. You can put copies on hold in our catalog. Stop by the library for your own print copy of the list.

In-Depth Program Look: Pet Sitting 101

Posted & filed under Blog, Youth & Teen.

This month, we will be taking an in-depth review for one of our more unique library programs: Pet Sitting 101. The program was an hour long and was a combination of presentation, interactive question and answer, and activities. It took place early on in Shark Week, so we could use this program to promote a week’s worth of shark and animal themed programming!

Program Outline:

We began the program by having kids talk about their own pets. Most were excited to share information about their animals and it was a great way to get them engaged.

We then went into general information about pet sitting – both techniques to use as well as some things on the business side (resume, how to market yourself). This was pretty brief (about 10-15 minutes) so as not to lose kids attention. Since all the information was researched, we briefly talked to kids about where the information came from and where to look for more info on their own time.

We then went to a multiple choice game where kids had to run and stick a post-it note on the answer they thought was correct. This got them moving and more interested and focused on the information being presented.

Kids were then able to take the last 15-20 minutes to make different toys for dogs and cats as well as a type of natural dog treat. This allowed them to learn about activities to play as well as what types of foods most animals ate. Items that kids did not want to take with them we donated and provided them with more information about organizations in Lincolnwood and the surrounding areas so that kids could volunteer and gain more experience. Donating the items is also an easy entry point to establishing positive community relationships.

Program Benefits:

Kids got an early introduction to some basic business skills

Share and celebrate a love of pets

Encouraging kids to be proactive in getting things done and working

The goal was not to have kids fall in love with business, but they were able to hopefully gain some basic tips and tricks that they can remember when it comes time for them to start earning money.

Program Quotes:

“I don’t think I knew any of this before!”

“I could talk about my pet all day”

“I didn’t know you could donate things to animals, that’s such a good idea”

“My dog is going to love this!”

This is a great program to provide kids and teens an introduction to work skills in a low pressure, non-formal environment, while still exposing them to important ideas they can use later in their life!

YTS Program Wrap-up: Junior Justice League

Posted & filed under Blog, Youth & Teen.

With the school-year wrapping up, we will be taking a look at a few of our recurring Youth & Teen programs. The first one is our Junior Justice League

This school year, our Junior Justice League completed 7 service based projects. Kids in Grades 3-8 learned about a variety of different organizations and ways to get involved in the Lincolnwood community, including voting, the environment, and animals. In total, kids amassed hundreds of volunteer hours, while learning about issues that impact them on a daily basis. Here, you can find out more about some of the organizations and people that worked with the Junior Justice League heroes.

Get Out The Vote Signs (with the Niles Township Government)
Get Out the Vote cards
Kindness Bingo (through the Niles Township Kindness Campaign)
Making dog toys for Chi Town Pitties Rescue
Writing thank you notes to the National Parks Service and Deputy Chris Obrochta (for saving animal in a kennel fire)

IF you are interested in earning volunteer hours or learning more about getting involved in issues that impact the Lincolnwood area, talk to librarian Eti Berland (eberland@lincolnwoodlibrary.org ) or stop by the YTS department! We can’t wait for another year of working for Justice!

http://lincolnwoodtogether.org/ – Lincolnwood Together (Get Out the Vote Project)

http://nilestownshipgov.com/officials/bonnie-kahn-ognisanti/ – Bonnie Kahn (Get out the Vote Project)

http://www.cardsforhospitalizedkids.com/ – Cards for Hospitalized Kids (National Movement)

https://www.nps.gov/index.htm – National Parks Service (Letters to National Park Service)

https://www.dailyherald.com/news/20190202/dupage-recognizes-sheriffs-deputy-who-saved-dogs-in-kennel-fire – Deputy Chris Obrochta (thank you cards for saving animals in a kennel fire)

https://www.chicagotribune.com/suburbs/glenview/community/chi-ugc-article-niles-township-unveils-kindness-campaign-sec-2019-02-12-story.html – Niles Township Kindness Campaign (Kindness Bingo Cards)

https://www.ipositive.org/ – Institute for Positive Mental Health (Kindness Bears Project)

https://chitownpitties.org/ – Chi Town Pitties Rescue (dog toy making for donation)

YTS Program Wrap Up: Books & Bites

Posted & filed under Blog, Book Discussions, Youth & Teen.

This year in Books & Bites exposed kids to lots of different books in our collection, as well as the major ideas in those books! Take a look at some of the selections below to check them out from our library. They also got to talk with author Jerry Craft, the author of the acclaimed graphic novel New Kid. Furthermore, kids learned and practiced giving their own book talks and promoted their own favorite books at the end of the year. In talking with some of the participants, kids felt that “my voice was heard about the books and their ideas” and that they “learned about a lot of great books that I otherwise wouldn’t have ever heard about.” We are already planning on the summer and next school year’s selection, so be sure to check out the calendar and join us soon!

The Witch Boy – Ostertag

All’s Faire in Middle School – Jamieson

Brave – Chmakova

Lowriders in Space – Camper; illustrated by Gonzalez

Cardboard Kingdom – Sell

New Kid – Craft

Smile – Telgemeier

Free Comic Book Day Celebration
Jerry Craft, author of New Kid
All’s Faire in Middle School!