Caldecott Club Voting Party 2021

Posted & filed under Blog, Book Discussions, Early Literacy, Youth & Teen.

Welcome back to our 2021 Caldecott Club! I’m Miss Eti, one of the Youth & Teen Services librarians at Lincolnwood Library. We have come full circle during this, our 4th Caldecott Club, inspired by the fantastic program that Brian Wilson created at Evanston Public Library in 2016. This year we are hosting a collaborative virtual Caldecott Club WITH Mr. Brian and Evanston Public Library. We have been learning so much about how to host this program virtually – and it’s been so fun to join together across our community to geek out about gorgeous picture books!

We met together on Zoom on January 19, 2021 with a group of wonderful readers, their families, and friends to talk about all things picture books. We designed this program to be open to kids from around 1st grade through 8th grade and up because picture books are for everybody and everyone can learn from each other. I’ve tried to recap their brilliance in this post. (You can read the recaps from Session #1 here, Session #2 here, and Session #3 here.) We reached the culmination of our hard work picture walking and evaluating picture books for months: The Voting Party! We were joined by our program buddy, Ann, and our Evanston Library buddy, Laura. We also were joined by a special guest, Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast blogger, author, and librarian, Julie Danielson!

During this program series, different kids have attended a variety of sessions so it was pretty exciting to have most of our regular attendees – and some new friends attend our culminating program. The wonderful thing about picture books is their accessibility for engagement, whether you’re a first timer at Caldecott Club or a longtime fan. 

We began our session by reviewing what the Caldecott award is, which is “most distinguished American picture book for children awarded by the Association for Library Service to Children.” Mr. Brian, as usual, revealed the books we’d discuss and helped get us excited! He also encouraged us to listen to each other and approach each book with an open mind. We then jumped into our discussion. We started the conversation about each book with a quick booktalk/picture walk to ensure everyone was familiar with the books. (The summaries below are from the descriptions from the publishers’ pages.) During our discussion, we asked the kids to share what they liked about the art, starting with the positive things first, as per the CCBC Book Discussion Guidelines, and then share what didn’t work for them about the art. A reoccurring theme throughout our discussion that the kids brought up was comparing the books to each other, which is a helpful strategy for all committees.

Our essential questions were:

  • What did you like about the art?
  • How well did the art express the themes/ideas/story? 
  • Why should it win our Caldecott Club Award? 
  • What could have been done better? Why shouldn’t it win our Caldecott Club Award?

Lift by Minh Lê, illustrated by Dan Santat

Lift

Iris loves to push the elevator buttons in her apartment building, but when it’s time to share the fun with a new member of the family, she’s pretty put out. That is, until the sudden appearance of a mysterious new button opens up entire realms of possibility, places where she can escape and explore on her own. But when she’s forced to choose between going at it alone or letting her little brother tag along, Iris finds that sharing a discovery with the people you love can be the most wonderful experience of all.

Brian led our discussion about Lift. He started with a fantastic booktalk to recap Iris’s whirlwind adventures with the magical elevator button. He pointed out the unique features of the art in the comic-book style, the evocative facial expressions and body language, the use of humor, the dramatic page turns and double-page spreads, and use of perspective.

One reader shared how the art showed the girl’s emotions and how mad she got each time she didn’t get to press the button. Mr. Brian affirmed, “you could feel what she was feeling.” M. shared, “I love Lift because it’s drawn super well with all the little details.. and how every time [she] goes to a different place…” This led us into a discussion of the medium of Lift, which is usually found on the copyright page, but not in this book. The art is so fantastic and seems like it could be oil painting. We looked back at our notes and determined that it was made using Photoshop and Procreate. I have linked a video from Politics & Prose with Minh Lê and Dan Santat where Dan shows his process illustrating the book, including many of the things he changed between drafts (yay for the magical places inspirations)! A. shared that “every page has a special detail.” It was interesting how the comic book style worked for some readers and others did not prefer the format. Readers did share how they liked how it really showed emotion. L., shared, “I like it just fine. I actually love it. It’s one of my favorites.”

The Old Truck by Jerome Pumphrey & Jarrett Pumphrey

When is an old truck something more? On a small, bustling farm, a resilient and steadfast pickup works tirelessly alongside the family that lives there, and becomes a part of the dreams and ambitions of the family’s young daughter. After long days and years of hard work leave the old truck rusting in the weeds, it’s time for the girl to roll up her sleeves. Soon she is running her own busy farm, and in the midst of all the repairing and restoring, it may be time to bring her faithful childhood companion back to life.

Julie led our discussion about The Old Truck. She shared an excellent booktalk about the little girl growing up on the farm with the old truck as the constant in her life, and eventually she fixes up the old truck. Julie pointed out how it’s made with a mixture of traditional stamps and digital art, the limited color palette, simple shapes and patterns that express big ideas about working hard and family, inspired by the women in the creators’ family who worked really hard. Julie also pointed out how the truck stays in the same place in each spread. Y. shared that “this story is kind of unique. Most people end up buying different vehicles, but they keep this one, like it’s just as special as their family.” S. added, “I like how you could see the time passing.” R. said, “it’s kind of interesting to see how she grows up on every page.” M. added, “I really liked how the whole stamp thing. It looked really cool and I loved the color scheme – and I could see myself painting my walls using it.” Jules helped us think critically about the use of earth tones to convey meaning in The Old Truck – and how fitting it was for the themes of the story. Lu. shared how when we flipped through the book, it felt like a movie seeing the truck in the same place with everything changing. (10 points to us for making digital versions of the books available!)

We Are Water Protectors by Carole Lindstrom, illustrated by Michaela Goade

Inspired by the many Indigenous-led movements across North America, We Are Water Protectors issues an urgent rallying cry to safeguard the Earth’s water from harm and corruption–a bold and lyrical picture book written by Carole Lindstrom and vibrantly illustrated by Michaela Goade.

Water is the first medicine.
It affects and connects us all . . .

When a black snake threatens to destroy the Earth
And poison her people’s water, one young water protector
Takes a stand to defend Earth’s most sacred resource. 

I (Eti) led the discussion for We are Water Protectors. I reminded our group that it was illustrated by Michaela Goade, using watercolors, which is absolutely fitting and perfect for this book. I talked about how this book focuses on our relationship to water, and when the black snake/oil pipeline threatens the water, plants, animals, and people, the Indigenous-led resistance movement rises up to speak up and protect the water, which continues on today. H. shared, “I like this book because it teaches people how to treat the environment.” La. added, “I liked the watercolors. It really showed nature. I also liked why it was written and explained what was happening and why it’s bad.” You know I love good back-matter, too, my friend. Y. shared, “What I like about this is that they’re fighting for their water, just like some people right now during COVID, who don’t have water which is why they’re suffering so much.” (This powerful comment shows how incredible both this young reader is – and this gorgeous book that provokes this thoughtful comment. I can’t help but be reminded about the vital importance of access to clean water in Indian Country.) M. shared her favorite spreads when people are in a circle, declaring, “We stand/with our songs/and our drums./We are still here. She also really liked the spread that shows the negative impact of the pipeline on the wildlife, recognizing the creativity to express it.

The Ocean Calls by Tina Cho, illustrated by Jess X. Snow

A breathtaking picture book featuring a Korean girl and her haenyeo (free diving) grandmother about intergenerational bonds, finding courage in the face of fear, and connecting with our natural world. Dayeon wants to be a haenyeo just like Grandma. The haenyeo dive off the coast of Jeju Island to pluck treasures from the sea–generations of Korean women have done so for centuries. To Dayeon, the haenyeo are as strong and graceful as mermaids. To give her strength, Dayeon eats Grandma’s abalone porridge. She practices holding her breath while they do the dishes. And when Grandma suits up for her next dive, Dayeon grabs her suit, flippers, and goggles. A scary memory of the sea keeps Dayeon clinging to the shore, but with Grandma’s guidance, Dayeon comes to appreciate the ocean’s many gifts.

Julie led our discussion about The Ocean Calls. Julie talked about how Dayeon overcomes her fear of diving to join her grandmother, who is a haenyeo. Julie pointed out how the art was made digitally, pointing out the textures throughout the book, the mermaid imagery, playful perspectives, and magical purple. Julie also pointed out that Jess X. Snow worked really hard to accurately represent the haenyeo women in their culture. H. shared, “when they draw the ocean, if I were to do that, I would draw a straight line, but they drew waves, which is kind of cool.” Y. shared that he liked how Dayeon overcame her fear. M. shared how much she liked the backgrounds and surroundings with the colors, especially the ocean and the field. Lu. commented, “the ocean looks so real, you can almost feel it.” Julie talked about how the medium was really effective to express these ideas. Another reader added, “I like the way they draw everything. It makes it look super realistic and shows the expressions. Everything looks really fitting to the story.” B. shared, “I really like that they made the shadows into mermaid shapes. Also, I love mermaids. They’re one of my favorite things.” Julie shared that there’s a lot of mermaid imagery since the haenyeo are, as the author’s note states, “fondly known as Korea’s granny mermaids” and also “Indigenous marine biologists.” H. shared, “I think it should win since Dayeon had a fear of the water … and she went through it bravely and it tells the reader that fear is just another reason why you should try harder to do the things you’re afraid of.”

Our Little Kitchen by Jillian Tamaki 

Cover of Our Little Kitchen

In this lively, rousing picture book from Caldecott Honoree Jillian Tamaki, a crew of resourceful neighbors comes together to prepare a meal for their community. With a garden full of produce, a joyfully chaotic kitchen, and a friendly meal shared at the table, Our Little Kitchen is a celebration of full bellies and looking out for one another. Bonus materials include recipes and an author’s note about the volunteering experience that inspired the book.

Ann led our discussion of Our Little Kitchen. She shared a fantastic booktalk about community kitchen bringing everyone together. She pointed out how it was drawn with nib pens and colored digitally, with a comics art style. She also pointed out how the book uses onomatopoeia to visually show the sounds, immersing you in the kitchen noises and smells, with a mixture of realism and surrealism. Ms. Ann also pointed out the excellent author’s note and recipe endpapers. Y. shared, “I like how in the end, the kid says, ‘Ok, time to clean up!'” H. shared how she liked the use of onomatopoeia “to show the reader what they’re doing and how they’re doing it.” A. shared that she’s learning about onomatopoeia in school for writing, which is such a great personal connection. B. shared how she liked how there’s so much detail on all the pages. She also noticed the shape and size of the text. S. shared that she liked it because she likes graphic novels and also likes to cook and bake. R. pointed out how the book starts out quiet, gets loud and then gets quiet again. Ann pointed out how the use of white space helps communicate in the book. J. shared, “This is my favorite book. I like how the art is like a comic book.” Ann modeled a fantastic text-to-text comparison to reflect on the comics features between Our Little Kitchen and Lift. L. shared that the comics features felt stronger in Lift but liked Our Little Kitchen better because of the drawing style that feels like a page of well-drawn doodles. H. shared that “they’re making food to help people who don’t have it, so that’s nice to know . . . so it’s kind that they’re helping others.”

Swashby and the Sea by Beth Ferry, illustrated by Juana Martinez-Neal

Captain Swashby loves the sea, his oldest friend. And he loves his life by the sea just as it is: salty and sandy and serene. One day, much to Swashby’s chagrin, a young girl and her granny commandeer the empty house next door. All Swashby wants is for his new neighbors to GO AWAY and take their ruckus with them. When Swashby begins to leave notes in the sand for his noisy neighbors, however, the beach interferes with the messages that are getting across. Could it be that the captain’s oldest friend, the sea, knows what Swashby needs even better than he knows himself?

Laura led our discussion of Swashby and the Sea. She framed it as a story of “eventual friendship,” which is such a perfect way of putting it. Laura helped point out how the art shows how the sea is another character in the book. She shared how the expressions are larger than life, especially noticing the character’s eyes, noting the muted colors to convey it’s a beach story. H. shared how she liked how it’s an unlikely friendship story, appreciating how the girl never gives up and keeps coming back. B. added how it’s funny and liked how the ocean didn’t wash all the letters out, but made different words from the letters. L. declared that, “it should be first. It’s a good book – it’s about friendship – and I’m all about friendship. And it’s very funny too.” Y. shared that it’s also a favorite, and like The Ocean Calls, the girl went into the ocean even though she didn’t want to.

VOTING!

After we had walked through each book in a whirlwind of color and conversation, we were ready to vote for the winner of our 2021 Caldecott Club. This year, since we met virtually, I created a google form for people to vote for their first, second, and third choice. (If you’re interested in the technical details, I downloaded the results into an spreadsheet, calculated the number (1st place gets 3 points, 2 gets 2, and 3rd place gets 1) and then added up the totals. I then was able to screenshare to show how we got our results for full transparency. Finally, the math was complete and we were ready to announce our winners!

The Winner of our Evanston Public Library and Lincolnwood Library 2021 Mock Caldecott is….

Lift by Minh Lê, illustrated by Dan Santat

Lift

Our group selected 3 Honor Books:

Our Little Kitchen by Jillian Tamaki

Cover of Our Little Kitchen

Swashby and the Sea by Beth Ferry, illustrated by Juana Martinez-Neal

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The Old Truck by Jerome Pumphrey & Jarrett Pumphrey

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But wait, there’s more!

We will have a live Youth Media Awards Viewing Party on Zoom on Monday, January 25 at 8:00am CST! You can even get a special Grab & Go Kit in Lincolnwood Library’s Great Green Box. Register here.

Then, in the evening, we’ll meet up together at our regular Caldecott Club time (Monday, January 25 at 7pm CST) to watch selections from the Youth Media Awards webcast and react to the winners.

Resources

You can put Caldecott Club books on hold at our libraries here.

I have created a RESOURCE GUIDE with activities, videos, podcasts, program kit supplies, handouts, and more to share the sources we’ve used and continue the learning! We hope it will be useful for you to explore these books at home!

Thank you to everyone who joined us for Caldecott Club! Thank you so much to Mr. Brian for this incredible collaboration! Thank you so much to Ann and Laura for being our awesome buddies and facilitators. Thank. you to our special guest, Julie Danielson, for joining our Caldecott Club community, leading two discussions, and sharing your notable picture book expertise! And of course, thank you to our friends, families, and young readers who are our Caldecott Club!

Books & Bites, Jr. – Back to School

Posted & filed under Blog, Early Literacy.

Join us for our brand new book club, Books & Bites, Jr., specially designed for families to explore and share books together. Our first session will be about back to school. It will take place on Wednesday, September 16 at 6-7pm on Zoom! You can register here. No library required & all are welcome.

We have created FREE PROGRAM KITS that you can pick up at the library or schedule curbside pick-up. We have included our program hand-out, snacks, supplies for our craft, and of course, book swag. Feel free to give us a call at the library to reserve your kit, which supplies last. You can also pick up your kit after the event.

We will be discussing The King of Kindergarten by Derrick Barnes, illustrated by Vanessa Brantley-Newton, The Day You Begin by Jacqueline Woodson, illustrated by Rafael López, & Yasmin the Teacher by Saadia Faruqi, illustrated by Hatem Aly. You can borrow these books from our library or put them on hold in Overdrive.  You can also watch out the videos below before or after the program and continue the discussions with your children.

But, wait, there’s more!

Sign up for our next Books & Bites, Jr, when we’ll celebrate Superheroes on October 14 at 6pm!

We are also honored to welcome back Saadia Farqui to our virtual library on October 28 at 3:30pm and celebrate her middle-grade books, A Place at the Table (co-written by Laura Shovan) and A Thousand Questions! You can register here.

Additional Resources

Bookmarks: Celebrating Black Voices

The King of Kindergarten Crown Craft

The Day You Begin Lesson Plan

Meet Yasmin! Activities

Read Aloud Revival Podcast 

Comics Fest 2020 Recap

Posted & filed under Blog, Uncategorized, Youth & Teen.

It’s no secret that comics are our favorite thing. But what we love more than comics is geeking out about them with our community. It was a dream come true to host our first Comics Fest at Lincolnwood Library, which we reimagined to offer a variety of live and asynchronous virtual programs to engage patrons of all ages in our celebration of comics, creativity, and art!

Here’s a recap of our 2020 Comics Fest that took place this June.

Teen Comics Club

We made our monthly programs part of our Comics Fest, which added to the excitement and fun – and also enabled our attendees to win our gift card raffles. Our Teen Comics Club, which was started by local teen, Sofia, has grown over the months, drawing in (get it?) new friends to hang out, sketch, and share the latest memes they’ve created or enjoyed. I especially like how this program transforms based on the young people attending it, offering whatever they’re interested in creating or discussing.

Books & Bites: The Cardboard Kingdom by Chad Sell 

We hosted our usual Books & Bites Book Club with a discussion of The Cardboard Kingdom to prepare for our visit with Chad Sell. It was so fun returning to this magical world, especially reading it during this summer as we all seek out ways to connect, collaborate, and imagine with our community. We talked about which characters we would be in the kingdom, finding affinity with the Robot and the Animal Queen. Who is your favorite Cardboard Kingdom character? I will always have a special place in my heart for Seth, the Gargoyle.

Boom! Smash! Pow! Cartooning Workshop with Mark Anderson

We hosted an entertaining and informative cartooning workshop with talented cartoonist Mark Anderson who helped us draw our own superhero cartoons with clear step-by-step instructions that also provided lots of space for creativity and customization. Our participants came up with the most incredible, imaginative, and hilarious takes on the characters we were drawing! One of the benefits of hosting this program on Zoom is that we were able to spotlight the artists when they were sharing their art, so everyone could see their creations. Mark did an excellent job of pacing instruction, taking questions, giving each kid a chance to shine, and making drawing fun! After the success of this class, we will definitely be offering more drawing classes in the future.

Author Visit with Chad Sell 

The Cardboard Kingdom by Chad Sell and friends is one of the few graphic novels we’ve discussed several times in Books & Bites over the past years. It is just that good! We were thrilled to be able to host Chad Sell at our library close to the release of his newest book, Doodleville. Since our program was virtual, we had attendees from all over, including Texas, New Jersey, and even Senegal! Chad took us behind-the-scenes into creating The Cardboard Kingdom, showing how creativity is magic. He showed us the early stages of the art or the “doodle drafts,” revealing that it’s messy at the beginning and takes a while to figure it out. I especially loved learning about kids cosplaying as characters or making their own original characters out of cardboard. Chad led our group in discussing and sharing the characters we would be, which was a wonderful way to engage our patrons.

Chad then shared his latest book, Doodleville, introducing us to the delightful cast of characters and doodles, who are sure to be fan favorites. (I can’t wait to see Doodleville cosplay!) Chad showed us that what we create as young people stays with us throughout our life. I especially appreciated Chad’s attention to our social and emotional needs, talking about doubt and insecurity in creating art and ways we face these feelings. He then led us through a drawing demonstration to help us learn to draw some of the characters in Doodleville, which was so fun and hands-on! My favorite is KittyBunny. I’m still figuring out how to draw the ears – but that’s the whole point. Our group had many questions for Chad and everyone had a chance to share during the Q&A. Our group did not want our visit to end! It was truly a magical and wonderful author visit! 

We have partnered with our wonderful local independent bookstore, Booked in Evanston, to sell copies of Chad’s books. You can buy them here.

Author Visit with MK Czerwiec 

We were honored to host MK Czerwiec, aka the “Comic Nurse,” a nurse, cartoonist, educator, and co-founder of the field of Graphic Medicine in a live, interactive virtual visit. It was exciting to welcome attendees who had been fans of MK’s research and writing – and new people who had just discovered her work. MK shared her experiences that led her to write Taking Turns: Stories from HIV/AIDS Care Unit 371 and the process of creating autobiographical comics. She provided insights about the field of Graphic Medicine and how it has developed over time. She shared the definition of graphic medicine coined by Dr. Ian Williams “refer[ing] to the interface between the medium of comics and the discourses of health, illness, disability and caregiving.” 

It was fascinating to learn about the work of the Graphic Medicine community to collect and curate COVID-19 comics, which has been invaluable in sharing vital information and facilitating conversations – and continues to grow. I especially appreciated the many examples of Graphic Medicine texts that she shared, which is always helpful for finding new books to read and add to our collections.

She also shared some of the behind-the-scenes process of editing Menopause: A Comic Treatment, which comes out August 17, 2020 from Penn State University Press. (You can attend the virtual book launch hosted by local indie bookstore, Women and Children First, on August 20!) We then hosted an engaging Q&A where MK answered our audience’s many questions. Our audience also had the chance to add to the great conversation together in the chat. I am so grateful that we were able to facilitate this important discussion and advocate more for the power of comics in health. 

We have partnered with Booked in Evanston, to sell copies of MK’s books. You can buy them here.

Virtual Programs

We also wanted to make sure to offer virtual programs you could enjoy at your convenience. You can watch our Box City and Autobiographical Comics videos below at any time to join our programs. Feel free to share your results with us on social media or via email at youthservices@lincolnwoodlibrary.org. Share your creation with us to be entered into our Comics Fest raffle.

Giveaways

Anyone who attended our Comics Fest programs was able to receive a free swag bag. A HUGE thank you to Lion Forge/Oni Press and Scholastic who provided the giveaways. We still have limited supplies left if you stop the library. Feel free to let us know if you made any of the crafts in the bags and share your creations with us.

Comics Fest Resources

We have collected Comics Fest Resources, which includes information about our author visits, resources for reading comics, making comics, teaching with comics, Graphic Medicine, comics publishers, more virtual comics events, and more! Feel free to let us know how you use this resource. Our Comics Fest displays are also now available to browse in the library to Lincolnwood residents, so feel free to stop by and check out our comics.

We want to hear from you! 

Did you know that one of our Summer Reading challenges is to make a comic and share it with us? We’d love to see what you make! We’ve already received some amazing comics that we’ll post soon. 

What has been your favorite part of Comics Fest? What would you like us to do at our next Comics Fest?

Feel free to contact us at youthservices@lincolnwoodlibrary.org to share your feedback and ideas. 

A HUGE thank you to our Comics Fest team, Kate, Seth, Gaby, Lisa, Bill, Kevin, and Eti, for making Comics Fest 2020 a success!

Comics Fest 2020

Posted & filed under Blog, Youth & Teen.

Ever since we celebrated Graphic Novels in Libraries Month last July, librarians at Lincolnwood Public Library have been dreaming about ways to take your comics fandom to the next level. We know that readers often self-select comics, that they make imaginative, powerful original comics (which we can add to our collection), and they love talking about their favorite graphic novels. With this in mind, we have created our first Comics Fest at Lincolnwood Library, full of engaging and fun virtual programs for all ages, offering something for everyone. 

But wait, there’s more! We will have giveaways and comics swag! 

Attendees will receive a swag bag with program kits and publisher merch while supplies last. We will arrange a curbside pick-up appointment to get your bag. Anyone who attends a program will be entered into a raffle for a gift card from our local indie bookstores, Aw Yeah Comics & Booked. 

A huge thank you to Katie at Lion Forge/Oni Press and Lizette at Scholastic who provided giveaways for our swag bags! 

We thought we’d offer an overview of the programs and what to expect at our Comics Fest. We hope you will then register for our programs and join us. No library card needed. Please remember to include your email address to receive instructions on how to join the Zoom events.

Boom! Smash! Pow! Cartooning Workshop with Mark Anderson on Saturday, June 20 at 1-2pm CST (Grades K-5)

Learn how to draw your own superhero cartoons and then watch them come to life with cartoonist Mark Anderson on Zoom. Did you know that one of our Summer Reading challenges is to make a comic and share it with us? We’d love to see what you make!

Crafternoon: Box City on Monday, June 22 at 3:30pm (all ages) 

Inspired by The Cardboard Kingdom’s Megalopolis, watch our video for tips on how to create your own box city at home. This program is offered to all using YouTube; you can subscribe to us on YouTube to watch the video premiere at the date/time listed above, or watch any time afterward; this video will remain online. Feel free to share your results with us on social media or via email at youthservices@lincolnwoodlibrary.org. Anyone who shares their creation with us (picture or video) will be entered into our Comics Fest raffle.

Author Visit with Chad Sell on Thursday, June 25 at 3:30pm (all ages) 

Meet author Chad Sell in a live virtual visit as he discusses his award winning graphic novel, The Cardboard Kingdom, and his latest book, Doodleville. A drawing demonstration, and Q & A will follow. Our Books & Bites Book Club have discussed The Cardboard Kingdom several times – and always shared new insights about this incredible book. Chad’s books are delightful and imaginative, bursting with color and creativity, expressing his keen understanding of young people’s emotional lives and experiences.

Good news! We have partnered with our wonderful local independent bookstore, Booked in Evanston, to sell copies of Chad’s books. You can buy them HERE!

Author Visit with MK Czerwiec on Wednesday, June 24 at 6:00pm (9th grade-adult)

Join MK Czerwiec, aka the “Comic Nurse,” a nurse, cartoonist, educator, and co-founder of the field of Graphic Medicine in a live, interactive virtual visit.  Registration required; no Lincolnwood Library card needed. This program is offered using Zoom and will be live at scheduled time with no post-recording available. Please include your email address to receive instructions on how to join the Zoom event.

Thanks to the generosity of Penn State University Press, we have a FREE advance reading copy of Menopause: A Comic Treatment, which MK edited, and will be published in August, which we will give away at the program. 

You can read MK Czerwiec’s memoir, Taking Turns: Stories From HIV/AIDS Care Unit 371, right now on Hoopla. You can also read the Graphic Medicine Manifesto by MK Czerwiec, Ian Williams, Susan Merrill Squier, Michael J. Green right now on Hoopla.

We have also partnered with our wonderful local independent bookstore, Booked in Evanston, to sell copies of MK’s books. You can buy them HERE!

Virtual: Your Life in Panels: Autobiographical Comics Workshop: Youtube Premiere Video on Saturday, June 27 at 1:00pm (6th grade-adult) 

Tell your story in a new way through this autobiographical comics workshop. Watch our video for tips, then get creative on your own. This program is being offered to all using YouTube; you can subscribe to us on YouTube to watch the video premiere at the date/time listed above, or watch any time afterward; this video will remain online. Feel free to share your results with us on social media or via email at youthservices@lincolnwoodlibrary.org.

Anyone who shares their creation with us will be entered into our Comics Fest raffle. It’s also one of our Summer Reading challenges to make a comic! We love the comics we’ve received so far – and will add them to our collection.

Comics Displays 

We created several displays for readers to discover comics that are perfect for them because there are graphic novels for readers of all ages. We can pull any of these books for you to pick up during a curbside appointment.

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Which is your favorite graphic novel here?
You can read the Random House Graphic brochure “How to Read a Graphic Novel” here & learn more about this new imprint.

We have collected these lists of fantastic graphic novels (and comics-related titles) that you can use to discover your next favorite comic – and put them on hold or contact us to put them to pull them for you.

Great Graphic Novels: Early Readers

Great Graphic Novels: Middle Grade

Great Graphic Novels: Teen

Great Graphic Novels: Adult

Graphic Medicine 

We will actually give away this advanced reader copy of Menopause: A Comic Treatment, which MK Czerwiec edited, and will be published in August, at our author visit with MK! Register for your chance to win.

We also curated a Graphic Medicine display as we prepare for our highly-anticipated author visit with MK Czerwiec. Coined by Ian Williams in 2012, Graphic Medicine “denote(s) the role that comics can play in the study and delivery of healthcare.” Graphic Medicine focuses on the use of comics to tell stories of illness and health. You can also put these titles on hold or we can pull them for you.

Graphic Medicine: Youth

Graphic Medicine: Teen

Graphic Medicine: Adult

Comics Fest Resources

Want to learn more about our comics fest authors?

Curious to know more about Graphic Medicine?

Want information about making comics? Or how about teaching with comics?

Want resources for discovering comics you’ll love to read?

We’ve created a resource guide for Comics Fest you can check out at https://tinyurl.com/LNK-ComicsFest2020. We hope you will find it useful!

We want to hear from you! 
We want to know how you feel about comics. Why do you love comics? Which comics do you recommend? Let us know on social media or via email – and then we can share your brilliance.

We look forward to seeing you at Comics Fest!

Kids & Teens Ask: How Do I Find Things to Read?

Posted & filed under Blog, Youth & Teen.

Hello, Friends! It’s Eti, one of the Youth and Teen Services Librarians here at Lincolnwood Library. I’ve been thinking a lot about all of you and hope you’re doing well and staying safe. 

A frequent question we’ve received during this time is how to access ebooks and eaudiobooks while the physical library is closed. Did you know our library provides access to digital resources 24/7? Whether you’re looking for a book for a reading genre, independent reading, an audiobook to listen to while you’re cooking, or a read aloud to share with a loved one, we have resources to help you find your next great read. Please contact us if you have any questions or need assistance using these resources.

Lincolnwood residents who do not currently have a library card can now request a temporary card. Your temporary card ensures you are able to access eBooks and eAudiobooks, streaming movies, databases, online learning tools, and more, from anywhere, 24/7. Request your temporary card by completing this form.

OverDrive / Digital Library of Illinois

The Digital Library of Illinois Overdrive collection offers thousands of ebooks and eaudiobooks you can download to your smartphone, tablet, ereader, or computer via a service called OverDrive/Libby. 

Learn how to use OverDrive / Digital Library of Illinois on your mobile device with our resource guide. 

Learn how to use Overdrive/Digital Library of Illinois on your Kindle with our resource guide. 

Learn how to use Libby (app) with our resource guide. 

If a title is available, you can click BORROW and check it out. If a title is checked out, click PLACE A HOLD to request to read it next. If we do not own the title, click RECOMMEND to let us know that we should purchase it – and you’ll be the first to borrow it. Recommendations are often how we purchase items, so it helps us to know what you want to read. 

Hoopla Digital

Hoopla provides online and mobile access to ebooks, audiobooks, comics, music, movies and TV shows on your computer or mobile device. To use Hoopla on the go, install the free app from Google Play or the Apple App store. To use Hoopla on a computer, visit the Hoopla website. 

Learn how to use Hoopla on your mobile device with our resource guide.

Learn how to use Hoopla on your computer with our resource guide. 

There is no need to place holds on Hoopla. Every title in the collection is always available to check out 24/7. Lincolnwood residents can check out up to 8 items every month. Hoopla has also curated collections of Bonus Borrows titles that don’t count against your monthly limit. 

TumbleBooks | SD74 Teachers, please use this link.

TumbleBooks is a curated database of children’s ebooks including story books, read-alongs, chapter books, graphic novels, nonfiction, books in Spanish and French, and National Geographic videos. 

But wait, there’s more! Thanks to the generosity of TumbleBooks and their commitment to promote literacy during this time, they are offering free access to their other databases, TeenBookCloud, TumbleMath, and AudioBookCloud until August 2020! You can read as many books as you want, when you want, and on any device. There are no check-outs, holds, or downloads. Books are available instantly.

Curated Reading Lists 

We know you rely on our librarians to help you find books you’ll love, so we’ve created some curated collections of titles by genre or list that we know are available as ebooks and eaudiobooks to help you start reading today. If something isn’t available in the Digital Library of Illinois Overdrive collection, remember to put it on hold or recommend it for purchase – and then you’ll get it next. Titles in Hoopla are always available, so you may want to check out those first. 

Middle School Curated Reading List

If there’s a genre list you think we should make, feel free to let us know and we’ll try to make it for you. To find more good books, you can always check our Great Reads for Kids, Great Reads for Teens, and Early Literacy lists. You can then check if they’re available as ebooks from the resources above. You can also access curated Overdrive kids lists and teen lists.

We also have a database called NoveList that can help you find book suggestions based on appeal factors, mood, genre, readalikes, etc. This is a fantastic resource for caregivers and educators to help match readers with books they’ll love. 

We know you often seek out our reader’s advisory help to match individual readers with the just right books, so feel free to email us at YouthServices@lincolnwoodlibrary.org to get a personalized recommendation for you by sharing what you’ve read previously and what you’re in the mood for right now. Make sure to also check out our social media channels where we spotlight books we recommend.

Independent Bookstores 

Right now our local independent bookstores need our support more than ever, so if you are able to purchase books from them, they are still ordering and shipping books. Our local indie bookstore, Booked, who you may remember from partnering with us at our fantastic Kyle Lukoff, Jasmine Warga, and Saadia Faruqi author visits, is open for online sales and always available to help you find the perfect book. You can email them at info@bookedevanston.com. They also have gift cards available for purchase. Interested in audiobooks? Check them out on Libro.fm, which is an excellent resource for audiobooks that supports indie bookstores. 

Even More Digital Resources 
Many educational companies have made their reading resources available to schools and caregivers for free for the remainder of the school year. 

Epic!

Epic!’s digital library includes many of the best kids books, popular ebooks, and videos.  Epic is offering Remote Student Access to Epic through the end of the school year (June 30th, 2020), by teacher invitation. Share this link with your child’s teacher to help get your child access to Epic. 

Time for Kids

Time for Kids Digital Library is free for the rest of the school year. Caregivers & educators can subscribe for our grade-specific digital editions of TIME for Kids and Your $ financial literacy magazine. 

Audible Stories

Audible has curated a collection of audiobooks to read for free. All stories are free to stream on your desktop, laptop, phone or tablet.

Please feel free to contact us to let us know how we can support you – and to ask your own question for a potential future blog post. I’d love to know if you found any of these resources helpful. Read something you loved? Let us know. We’d love to hear from you! 



New Book Tuesday 8-13-19

Posted & filed under Blog.

Captain Underpants and the Preposterous Plight of the Purple Potty People by Dav Pilkey

When we last saw George and Harold, they were about to take their pet pterodactyl Crackers back to the Cretaceous period. But things didn’t work out quite as they had hoped. They’ve entered an absurd alternate reality where teachers are nice, kids are allowed to read banned books, and the cafeteria food doesn’t smell like dirty diapers. Even worse, they’ve discovered alternate versions of themselves–Evil George and Evil Harold–who plan to unleash some preposterous plans on Piqua, Ohio. Now it’s up to George and Harold to defeat the evil twins and THEIR superhero, Captain Blunderpants!

Code Like a Girl by Miriam Peskowitz

Welcome to Code Like a Girl, where you’ll get started on the adventure of coding with cool projects and step-by-step tips, from the co-author of the bestselling The Daring Book for Girls.

Coding is about creativity, self-expression, and telling your story. It’s solving problems and being curious, building things, making the world a better place, and creating a future. It’s about you: whoever you are, wherever you’re at, whatever you want. 

Nearly everything you encounter on a screen is made from code. You see, with code you can have an idea and put it into action: it’s your voice and your vision. From the outside, tech and code may seem puzzling and mysterious, but when you get through the door and past the first few beginner steps and your code starts to work, it feels like magic.

In this book, you’ll learn how to:
– Code with Scratch–projects like making a dog walk through the park, sending your friend a card, and devising a full-scoring game!
– Build your own computer–really!
– Create your own digital fortune-teller, with the Python language.
– Make your own smartphone gloves.
– Make light-up bracelets.
– Code a motion sensor that tells you when someone enters your room.

How to Be an Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi

From the National Book Award–winning author of Stamped from the Beginning comes a “groundbreaking” (Time) approach to understanding and uprooting racism and inequality in our society—and in ourselves.

“The only way to undo racism is to consistently identify and describe it—and then dismantle it.”

Antiracism is a transformative concept that reorients and reenergizes the conversation about racism—and, even more fundamentally, points us toward liberating new ways of thinking about ourselves and each other. At it’s core, racism is a powerful system that creates false hierarchies of human value; its warped logic extends beyond race, from the way we regard people of different ethnicities or skin colors to the way we treat people of different sexes, gender identities, and body types. Racism intersects with class and culture and geography and even changes the way we see and value ourselves. In How to Be an Antiracist, Kendi takes readers through a widening circle of antiracist ideas—from the most basic concepts to visionary possibilites—that will help readers see all forms of racism clearly, understand their posionous consequences, and work to oppose them in our systems and in ourselves.

Kendi weaves an electrifying combination of ethics, history, law, and science with his own personal story of awakening to antiracism. This is an essential work for anyone who wants to go beyond the awareness of racism to the next step: contributing to the formation of a just and equitable society.

The Dearly Beloved: A Novel by Cara Wall

Charles and Lily, James and Nan. They meet in Greenwich Village in 1963 when Charles and James are jointly hired to steward the historic Third Presbyterian Church through turbulent times. Their personal differences however, threaten to tear them apart.

Charles is destined to succeed his father as an esteemed professor of history at Harvard, until an unorthodox lecture about faith leads him to ministry. How then, can he fall in love with Lily—fiercely intellectual, elegantly stern—after she tells him with certainty that she will never believe in God? And yet, how can he not?

James, the youngest son in a hardscrabble Chicago family, spent much of his youth angry at his alcoholic father and avoiding his anxious mother. Nan grew up in Mississippi, the devout and beloved daughter of a minister and a debutante. James’s escape from his desperate circumstances leads him to Nan and, despite his skepticism of hope in all its forms, her gentle, constant faith changes the course of his life.

In The Dearly Beloved, we follow these two couples through decades of love and friendship, jealousy and understanding, forgiveness and commitment. Against the backdrop of turbulent changes facing the city and the church’s congregation, these four forge improbable paths through their evolving relationships, each struggling with uncertainty, heartbreak, and joy. A poignant meditation on faith and reason, marriage and children, and the ways we find meaning in our lives, Cara Wall’s The Dearly Beloved is a gorgeous, wise, and provocative novel that is destined to become a classic.

Texas Flood: The Inside Story of Stevie Ray Vaughan by Alan Paul and Andy Aledort

The first definitive biography of guitar legend Stevie Ray Vaughan, with an epilogue by Jimmie Vaughan, and foreword and afterword by Double Trouble’s Chris Layton and Tommy Shannon.

Just a few years after he almost died from a severe addiction to cocaine and alcohol, a clean and sober Stevie Ray Vaughan was riding high. His last album was his most critically lauded and commercially successful. He had fulfilled a lifelong dream by collaborating with his first and greatest musical hero, his brother Jimmie. His tumultuous marriage was over and he was in a new and healthy romantic relationship. Vaughan seemed poised for a new, limitless chapter of his life and career.

Instead, it all came to a shocking and sudden end on August 27, 1990, when he was killed in a helicopter crash following a dynamic performance with Eric Clapton. Just 35 years old, he left behind a powerful musical legacy and an endless stream of What Ifs. In the ensuing 29 years, Vaughan’s legend and acclaim have only grown and he is now an undisputed international musical icon. Despite the cinematic scope of Vaughan’s life and death, there has never been a truly proper accounting of his story. Until now.

Texas Flood provides the unadulterated truth about Stevie Ray Vaughan from those who knew him best: his brother Jimmie, his Double Trouble bandmates Tommy Shannon, Chris Layton and Reese 

Outfox: A Novel by Sandra Brown

#1 New York Times bestselling author Sandra Brown combines heart-stopping suspense and forbidden passion in this psychological thriller about an FBI agent’s hunt for a ruthless conman turned serial killer.

FBI agent Drex Easton is relentlessly driven by a single goal: to outmaneuver the conman once known as Weston Graham. Over the past thirty years, Weston has assumed many names and countless disguises, enabling him to lure eight wealthy women out of their fortunes before they disappeared without a trace, their families left without answers and the authorities without clues. The only common trait among the victims: a new man in their life who also vanished, leaving behind no evidence of his existence . . . except for one signature custom.

Drex is convinced that these women have been murdered, and that the man he knows as Weston Graham is the sociopath responsible. But each time Drex gets close to catching him, Weston trades one persona for another and disappears again. Now, for the first time in their long game of cat and mouse, Drex has a suspect in sight.

Attractive and charming, Jasper Ford is recently married to a successful businesswoman many years his junior, Talia Shafer. Drex insinuates himself into their lives, posing as a new neighbor and setting up surveillance on their house. The closer he gets to the couple, the more convinced he becomes that Jasper is the clever, merciless predator he’s sought–and that his own attraction to Talia threatens to compromise his purpose and integrity.

This is Drex’s one chance to outfox his cunning nemesis before he murders again and eludes justice forever. But first he must determine if the desirable Talia is a heartless accomplice . . . or the next victim.