New Book Tuesday 10-29-19

Posted & filed under Blog.

Smithsonian Tech Lab by Jack Challoner

This DK children’s book for ages 11-14 is brimming with exciting, educational activities and projects that focus on electronics and technology.

Keep your siblings out of your room with a brilliant bedroom alarm, power a propellor motorboat, make a thermoelectric phone charger, build a set of speakers, and construct a crane by following step-by-step instructions and using affordable equipment. Tech Lab will engage budding scientists and engineers as they experiment, invent, trial, and test technology, electronics, and mechanics at home.

Simple steps with clear photographs take readers through the stages of each low-cost project, with fact-filled panels to explain the science behind each one, and to fascinate them with real-world examples.
With an increasing focus across school curricula on encouraging children to explore STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering, and maths), Tech Lab is the perfect companion for any inquisitive child with an interest in how the worlds of science experiments and technology work, and why.”

I Am Not a Number by Dr. Jenny Kay Dupuis

When Irene is removed from her First Nations family to live in a residential school, she is confused, frightened and terribly homesick. She tries to remember who she is and where she came from despite being told to do otherwise. When she goes home for summer holidays, her parents decide never to send her away again, but where will she hide and what will happen when her parents disobey the law?

Nerd A to Z: Your Reference to Literally Figuratively Everything You’ve Always Wanted to Know by T.J.Resler

Want to know how likely it is that robots will take over the world? Or what Viking heroes were really like? Find out in this guide to all things smart and geeky–from ancient history to sci-fi technology, Marvel superheroes to edible insects, and beyond!

Move over dictionary. There’s a new reference book in town!

This superstuffed alphabetical compendium of must-know facts from science, pop culture, history, and more is perfect for kids who already know the names of every single dinosaur or want to understand exactly how the Millennium Falcon works. It’s a book for grammar gurus, science snobs, music geeks, and history buffs. In short, it’s a book for nerds.

Inside, you’ll find browsable, info-packed blurbs that’ll give you the lowdown on everything from augmented reality to zydeco, with larger features that dive deep into fascinating topics like UFOs, pirates, artificial intelligence, and daring circus acts. You’ll find out what kind of nerd you are with superfun flowchart quizzes. And you’ll hear from the world’s most notable (and quotable) Nerds of Note from history and today.

Denied, Detained, Deported by Ann Bausum

The Statue of Liberty’s welcoming arms are a symbol held dear to Americans. But the reality is that the issue of immigration, both today and throughout history, has not always been about welcoming; it has also been about keeping out. Often U.S. immigration policy has been less encompassing and more limiting, and sometimes it has even been ruled by racism, prejudice, political concerns, and fear. Immigrants yearning to breathe free have found themselves denied, as when the St. Louis, a ship filled with Jewish refugees from Nazi Germany, sought refuge in American ports and was turned away. Immigrants have found themselves detained, as when Japanese Americans during World War II were rounded up and placed in detention centers – regardless of their patriotism – for security reasons. And immigrants have found themselves deported, sometimes for their radical political views, as did Emma Goldman, who after 30 years in the U.S. was rounded up and sent back to Russia after she was branded a dangerous extremist. Ann Bausum examines these immigrant stories from history, the stories of the denied, detained, and deported, so that we can learn from past successes – and past mistakes. Shedding light on the dark side of immigration helps inform one of the most important policy debates of our time. It helps us chart a course true to our past and good for our future. It helps us keep the golden lamp of liberty burning bright.

The Big Book of Monsters by Hal Johnson

Meet the monsters in this who’s who of the baddest of the bad!

Like those supernatural beasts everyone knows and fears—the bloodsucking vampire, Count Dracula, and that eight-foot-tall mash-up of corpses, Frankenstein’s Monster. Or that scariest of mummies, Cheops, who scientists revived after 4,700 years—big mistake! Or more horrifying yet, the Horla, an invisible, havoc-wreaking creature that herds humans like cattle and feeds of their souls.

Drawn from the pages of classic books and tales as old as time, this frightfully exciting collection features 25 of the creepiest creatures ever imagined, from witches and werewolves to dragons and ghosts. Every monster is brought to life in a full-size full-color portrait that captures the essence of the beast, and in lively text that recounts the monster’s spine-tingling story. With sidebars that explore the history and the genre of each sourcebook, The Big Book of Monsters is an exciting introduction to literature and language arts.

Cryptid Creatures by Kelly Milner Halls

Explore the fascinating world of cryptozoology with this fun guide, filled with eyewitness accounts of 50 cryptids found throughout the world, some of which have been proven real.

Cryptozoology is the study of mysterious creatures that fall between the realm of real and imaginary on the scientific spectrum. Cryptid Creatures: A Field Guide offers a closer look at fifty of these amazing creatures, examining the best possible evidence for each, including scientific papers, magazine and newspaper articles, and credible eyewitness accounts.

The fifty cryptids are arranged in order alphabetically, and in addition to speculative illustrations, include details like when they were first reported, whether they are terrestrial, aerial, or aquatic, and each have a reality rating of 1 to 6, in which 1 means that the cryptid has been confirmed as a hoax, and 6 means the cryptid has been proven as real.

This page-turning guide will inspire curious readers to investigate more on their own, and maybe even help to prove if a cryptid is a hoax or is real.