Comics Fest 2020

Posted & filed under Blog, Youth & Teen.

Ever since we celebrated Graphic Novels in Libraries Month last July, librarians at Lincolnwood Public Library have been dreaming about ways to take your comics fandom to the next level. We know that readers often self-select comics, that they make imaginative, powerful original comics (which we can add to our collection), and they love talking about their favorite graphic novels. With this in mind, we have created our first Comics Fest at Lincolnwood Library, full of engaging and fun virtual programs for all ages, offering something for everyone. 

But wait, there’s more! We will have giveaways and comics swag! 

Attendees will receive a swag bag with program kits and publisher merch while supplies last. We will arrange a curbside pick-up appointment to get your bag. Anyone who attends a program will be entered into a raffle for a gift card from our local indie bookstores, Aw Yeah Comics & Booked. 

A huge thank you to Katie at Lion Forge/Oni Press and Lizette at Scholastic who provided giveaways for our swag bags! 

We thought we’d offer an overview of the programs and what to expect at our Comics Fest. We hope you will then register for our programs and join us. No library card needed. Please remember to include your email address to receive instructions on how to join the Zoom events.

Boom! Smash! Pow! Cartooning Workshop with Mark Anderson on Saturday, June 20 at 1-2pm CST (Grades K-5)

Learn how to draw your own superhero cartoons and then watch them come to life with cartoonist Mark Anderson on Zoom. Did you know that one of our Summer Reading challenges is to make a comic and share it with us? We’d love to see what you make!

Crafternoon: Box City on Monday, June 22 at 3:30pm (all ages) 

Inspired by The Cardboard Kingdom’s Megalopolis, watch our video for tips on how to create your own box city at home. This program is offered to all using YouTube; you can subscribe to us on YouTube to watch the video premiere at the date/time listed above, or watch any time afterward; this video will remain online. Feel free to share your results with us on social media or via email at youthservices@lincolnwoodlibrary.org. Anyone who shares their creation with us (picture or video) will be entered into our Comics Fest raffle.

Author Visit with Chad Sell on Thursday, June 25 at 3:30pm (all ages) 

Meet author Chad Sell in a live virtual visit as he discusses his award winning graphic novel, The Cardboard Kingdom, and his latest book, Doodleville. A drawing demonstration, and Q & A will follow. Our Books & Bites Book Club have discussed The Cardboard Kingdom several times – and always shared new insights about this incredible book. Chad’s books are delightful and imaginative, bursting with color and creativity, expressing his keen understanding of young people’s emotional lives and experiences.

Good news! We have partnered with our wonderful local independent bookstore, Booked in Evanston, to sell copies of Chad’s books. You can buy them HERE!

Author Visit with MK Czerwiec on Wednesday, June 24 at 6:00pm (9th grade-adult)

Join MK Czerwiec, aka the “Comic Nurse,” a nurse, cartoonist, educator, and co-founder of the field of Graphic Medicine in a live, interactive virtual visit.  Registration required; no Lincolnwood Library card needed. This program is offered using Zoom and will be live at scheduled time with no post-recording available. Please include your email address to receive instructions on how to join the Zoom event.

Thanks to the generosity of Penn State University Press, we have a FREE advance reading copy of Menopause: A Comic Treatment, which MK edited, and will be published in August, which we will give away at the program. 

You can read MK Czerwiec’s memoir, Taking Turns: Stories From HIV/AIDS Care Unit 371, right now on Hoopla. You can also read the Graphic Medicine Manifesto by MK Czerwiec, Ian Williams, Susan Merrill Squier, Michael J. Green right now on Hoopla.

We have also partnered with our wonderful local independent bookstore, Booked in Evanston, to sell copies of MK’s books. You can buy them HERE!

Virtual: Your Life in Panels: Autobiographical Comics Workshop: Youtube Premiere Video on Saturday, June 27 at 1:00pm (6th grade-adult) 

Tell your story in a new way through this autobiographical comics workshop. Watch our video for tips, then get creative on your own. This program is being offered to all using YouTube; you can subscribe to us on YouTube to watch the video premiere at the date/time listed above, or watch any time afterward; this video will remain online. Feel free to share your results with us on social media or via email at youthservices@lincolnwoodlibrary.org.

Anyone who shares their creation with us will be entered into our Comics Fest raffle. It’s also one of our Summer Reading challenges to make a comic! We love the comics we’ve received so far – and will add them to our collection.

Comics Displays 

We created several displays for readers to discover comics that are perfect for them because there are graphic novels for readers of all ages. We can pull any of these books for you to pick up during a curbside appointment.

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Which is your favorite graphic novel here?
You can read the Random House Graphic brochure “How to Read a Graphic Novel” here & learn more about this new imprint.

We have collected these lists of fantastic graphic novels (and comics-related titles) that you can use to discover your next favorite comic – and put them on hold or contact us to put them to pull them for you.

Great Graphic Novels: Early Readers

Great Graphic Novels: Middle Grade

Great Graphic Novels: Teen

Great Graphic Novels: Adult

Graphic Medicine 

We will actually give away this advanced reader copy of Menopause: A Comic Treatment, which MK Czerwiec edited, and will be published in August, at our author visit with MK! Register for your chance to win.

We also curated a Graphic Medicine display as we prepare for our highly-anticipated author visit with MK Czerwiec. Coined by Ian Williams in 2012, Graphic Medicine “denote(s) the role that comics can play in the study and delivery of healthcare.” Graphic Medicine focuses on the use of comics to tell stories of illness and health. You can also put these titles on hold or we can pull them for you.

Graphic Medicine: Youth

Graphic Medicine: Teen

Graphic Medicine: Adult

Comics Fest Resources

Want to learn more about our comics fest authors?

Curious to know more about Graphic Medicine?

Want information about making comics? Or how about teaching with comics?

Want resources for discovering comics you’ll love to read?

We’ve created a resource guide for Comics Fest you can check out at https://tinyurl.com/LNK-ComicsFest2020. We hope you will find it useful!

We want to hear from you! 
We want to know how you feel about comics. Why do you love comics? Which comics do you recommend? Let us know on social media or via email – and then we can share your brilliance.

We look forward to seeing you at Comics Fest!

Kids & Teens Ask: How Do I Find Things to Read?

Posted & filed under Blog, Youth & Teen.

Hello, Friends! It’s Eti, one of the Youth and Teen Services Librarians here at Lincolnwood Library. I’ve been thinking a lot about all of you and hope you’re doing well and staying safe. 

A frequent question we’ve received during this time is how to access ebooks and eaudiobooks while the physical library is closed. Did you know our library provides access to digital resources 24/7? Whether you’re looking for a book for a reading genre, independent reading, an audiobook to listen to while you’re cooking, or a read aloud to share with a loved one, we have resources to help you find your next great read. Please contact us if you have any questions or need assistance using these resources.

Lincolnwood residents who do not currently have a library card can now request a temporary card. Your temporary card ensures you are able to access eBooks and eAudiobooks, streaming movies, databases, online learning tools, and more, from anywhere, 24/7. Request your temporary card by completing this form.

OverDrive / Digital Library of Illinois

The Digital Library of Illinois Overdrive collection offers thousands of ebooks and eaudiobooks you can download to your smartphone, tablet, ereader, or computer via a service called OverDrive/Libby. 

Learn how to use OverDrive / Digital Library of Illinois on your mobile device with our resource guide. 

Learn how to use Overdrive/Digital Library of Illinois on your Kindle with our resource guide. 

Learn how to use Libby (app) with our resource guide. 

If a title is available, you can click BORROW and check it out. If a title is checked out, click PLACE A HOLD to request to read it next. If we do not own the title, click RECOMMEND to let us know that we should purchase it – and you’ll be the first to borrow it. Recommendations are often how we purchase items, so it helps us to know what you want to read. 

Hoopla Digital

Hoopla provides online and mobile access to ebooks, audiobooks, comics, music, movies and TV shows on your computer or mobile device. To use Hoopla on the go, install the free app from Google Play or the Apple App store. To use Hoopla on a computer, visit the Hoopla website. 

Learn how to use Hoopla on your mobile device with our resource guide.

Learn how to use Hoopla on your computer with our resource guide. 

There is no need to place holds on Hoopla. Every title in the collection is always available to check out 24/7. Lincolnwood residents can check out up to 8 items every month. Hoopla has also curated collections of Bonus Borrows titles that don’t count against your monthly limit. 

TumbleBooks | SD74 Teachers, please use this link.

TumbleBooks is a curated database of children’s ebooks including story books, read-alongs, chapter books, graphic novels, nonfiction, books in Spanish and French, and National Geographic videos. 

But wait, there’s more! Thanks to the generosity of TumbleBooks and their commitment to promote literacy during this time, they are offering free access to their other databases, TeenBookCloud, TumbleMath, and AudioBookCloud until August 2020! You can read as many books as you want, when you want, and on any device. There are no check-outs, holds, or downloads. Books are available instantly.

Curated Reading Lists 

We know you rely on our librarians to help you find books you’ll love, so we’ve created some curated collections of titles by genre or list that we know are available as ebooks and eaudiobooks to help you start reading today. If something isn’t available in the Digital Library of Illinois Overdrive collection, remember to put it on hold or recommend it for purchase – and then you’ll get it next. Titles in Hoopla are always available, so you may want to check out those first. 

Middle School Curated Reading List

If there’s a genre list you think we should make, feel free to let us know and we’ll try to make it for you. To find more good books, you can always check our Great Reads for Kids, Great Reads for Teens, and Early Literacy lists. You can then check if they’re available as ebooks from the resources above. You can also access curated Overdrive kids lists and teen lists.

We also have a database called NoveList that can help you find book suggestions based on appeal factors, mood, genre, readalikes, etc. This is a fantastic resource for caregivers and educators to help match readers with books they’ll love. 

We know you often seek out our reader’s advisory help to match individual readers with the just right books, so feel free to email us at YouthServices@lincolnwoodlibrary.org to get a personalized recommendation for you by sharing what you’ve read previously and what you’re in the mood for right now. Make sure to also check out our social media channels where we spotlight books we recommend.

Independent Bookstores 

Right now our local independent bookstores need our support more than ever, so if you are able to purchase books from them, they are still ordering and shipping books. Our local indie bookstore, Booked, who you may remember from partnering with us at our fantastic Kyle Lukoff, Jasmine Warga, and Saadia Faruqi author visits, is open for online sales and always available to help you find the perfect book. You can email them at info@bookedevanston.com. They also have gift cards available for purchase. Interested in audiobooks? Check them out on Libro.fm, which is an excellent resource for audiobooks that supports indie bookstores. 

Even More Digital Resources 
Many educational companies have made their reading resources available to schools and caregivers for free for the remainder of the school year. 

Epic!

Epic!’s digital library includes many of the best kids books, popular ebooks, and videos.  Epic is offering Remote Student Access to Epic through the end of the school year (June 30th, 2020), by teacher invitation. Share this link with your child’s teacher to help get your child access to Epic. 

Time for Kids

Time for Kids Digital Library is free for the rest of the school year. Caregivers & educators can subscribe for our grade-specific digital editions of TIME for Kids and Your $ financial literacy magazine. 

Audible Stories

Audible has curated a collection of audiobooks to read for free. All stories are free to stream on your desktop, laptop, phone or tablet.

Please feel free to contact us to let us know how we can support you – and to ask your own question for a potential future blog post. I’d love to know if you found any of these resources helpful. Read something you loved? Let us know. We’d love to hear from you! 



Program Recap: Zombie Night

Posted & filed under Blog, Youth & Teen.

Once again, our Council of Awesome T(w)eens hosted an after-hours program zombie night. Teens and T(w)eens can come to the library after hours on a Saturday for playing zombie tag, games of Mafia and capture the flag.

Everyone was broken up (somewhat randomly) into four separate teams. While not everyone could be with all of their friends, it did allow kids to be social, which is one of the primary goals of Zombie Night. Kids often make new friends, and get to talk with kids that they might not already know. We split 2 random teams to go and play mafia, and other teams to play capture the flag. The lights were dimmed and the library was decorated. This was beneficial because it allowed for smaller groups, and kids felt more comfortable to participate.

Also, the capture the flag game had time limits, with the final minutes being jail free and forcing people to go onto the opposition’s territory, which also encouraged participation and action. We only used the Youth & Teen area of the library, and the small space allowed for a more action-packed game of capture the flag! This also allowed for different versions of capture the flag, including versions with spies, multiple flags, and even a sudden death version! Kids could also switch after games, which gave kids multiple options.

We finished the night with pizza and snacks and conversation. This program is also an opportunity to showcase how one can volunteer and be a part of an active library, and see first-hand how much fun our volunteers have planning programs. Be sure to check back soon for more programs!

Exploration Station Review: Light and Heavy

Posted & filed under Blog, Early Literacy, Uncategorized, Youth & Teen.

Want to do some crafts at home, as well as explore some scientific principles? Here’s what we did at exploration station this week. You can join us on Thursdays at 11:30 for a new theme every week. This week was light and heavy. We read Balance the Birds, which is a great introduction to the scientific idea of weight, balance, and logic!

We did three activities. The first was a “Does it float?” station, which had two small bins filled half way with water. There was a wide variety of objects – all of which could be found in a house – cloth, pens, magnets, and more. Kids were able to explore whether or not they float, with caregivers asking questions along the way. It allowed kids to think through the idea of weight and how to apply it practically.

Some of our items for our “Does it Float?” Station

The second activity was to use an actual balancing scale. Many kids had not interacted with one before, and found it fascinating to see how directly weight impacted the scale. The fact that some bigger items were not always heavier was a main theme throughout the program.

The final program was to make a DIY scale. Kids used cups with a hole punched in it. They then used string or yarn to make a loop through the hole. They then connected the string to ends on a Popsicle stick. Kids were proud to be able to utilize scales themselves, and excited they could continue to play with weight at home.

Working on our DIY Scales

Join us on Thursdays for more Exploration Stations!

Program Recap: Weird and Wacky Sound Editing

Posted & filed under Blog, Uncategorized, Youth & Teen.

This month, we hosted an introductory sound editing program. This program is unique for many reasons. First, it engaged kids who were not as interested in other, traditional programs, and had a greater interest in music than other mediums. Kids were able to pick their own music, record their own voices, or they can use pre-downloaded audio that was pre-loaded. Second, it accessed a unique combination of traditional creativity combined with modern technology. Most kids had never explored these types of technology pieces, and it was done in a low pressure environment. Third, they were able to have something complicated and their own as a finished piece of audio that was all their own.

Sound Editing Effects

Attached is a list of the effects that we worked with. After briefly going over different effects and how to implement them, kids were able to use their own creativity and explore what they wanted. It was both polished and, indeed, wacky. Be sure to check out our upcoming programs for February! See you there!

Caldecott Club 2020 Voting Party

Posted & filed under Blog, Youth & Teen.

Hi! I’m Miss Eti, one of the Youth & Teen Services librarians. We hosted our highly anticipated Caldecott Club Party on Thursday, January 9 from 3:30-5:00 (and a bit beyond that) at Lincolnwood Library. Over the course of the past three months, we’ve explored twenty incredible picture books published in 2019, conducted picture walks through the books to examine the art with our artist eyes, and voted for our top 11 books that would go to our voting party. We had also developed as a community of readers, gaining new members of our Caldecott Club, who each added new insights to our discussions. It had all come down to this session where we’d choose THE best picture book of 2019. (If you’re new here and want to learn about our program, check out first blog post about Creating a Caldecott Community.)

The books we discussed were:

The Little Guys by Vera Brosgol 

Carl and the Meaning of Life by Deborah Freedman 

Bear Came Along by Richard T. Morris, illustrated by LeUyen Pham 

Another by Christian Robinson 

When Aidan Became a Brother by Kyle Lukoff, illustrated by Kaylani Juanita 

At the Mountain’s Base by Traci Sorell, illustrated by Weshoyot Alvitre 

My Papi Has a Motorcycle by Isabel Quintero, illustrated by Zeke Peña 

Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story by Kevin Noble Maillard, illustrated by Juana Martinez-Neal 

Saturday by Oge Mora

The Undefeated by Kwame Alexander, illustrated by Kadir Nelson 

Hair Love by Matthew A. Cherry, illustrated by Vashti Harrison

During this program series, different kids have attended a variety of sessions so it was pretty exciting to have most of our regular attendees – and some new friends – attend our culminating program. The wonderful thing about picture books is their accessibility for engagement, whether you’re a first timer at Caldecott Club or a longtime fan. 

We began our session by reviewing what the Caldecott award is, which is “most distinguished American picture book for children awarded by the Association for Library Service to Children.” Our group used their own language to determine what makes a Caldecott worthy book. Ms. Gaby offered multitasking support by keeping us on track with a timer that allotted five minutes per book. I urged her not to listen to me when I asked for more time – and we were pretty good at sticking to our plans. She also helped us with the slides so everyone could see the images of the books – and frequently went back and forth for the kids to spotlight things they noticed and lead us in close reading. Ms. Lisa, our newest Youth and Teen Services staff member, was also instrumental to the success of our program, managing so many new tasks during her first week with us. A huge thank you to Ms. Gaby and Ms. Lisa for all of their help at Caldecott Club!! We also had a special guest, pre-service teacher educator, Dr. Shira Roth, who kindly brought art giveaways for our Caldecott Club! 

We then jumped into our discussion. I started the conversation about each book with a quick booktalk/picture walk to ensure everyone was familiar with the books. (The summaries below are from the descriptions in our library catalog and the publisher’s pages.) During our discussion, I asked the kids to share what they liked about the art, starting with the positive things first, as per the CCBC Book Discussion Guidelines, and then share what didn’t work for them about the art.

The Little Guys by Vera Brosgol

Tiny creatures rampage through a forest collecting food for themselves only to discover that kindness and cooperation trump greed.

This book was one of our first books we discussed back in October, but our group remembered it fondly. Yu. shared that “the art is neat and nice and understandable.” Al. added that “it’s not one flat color. It has textures and lots of other colors.” M. expressed that “It’s really simple which gives it character.” C. thought that it had a good lesson. Em. shared that “maybe kids would like it so they would know how to not annoy their brothers and sisters,” which we connected to the criteria about recognition of a child audience. Ya. added to our discussion of the theme by saying, “the lesson is sharing is caring.” Ay. mused about the design of the little guys, saying, “it’s kind of creepy so it gives it a kind of scary tone to it, which I like, and at the same time, I don’t like it,” to which, S. added, “yeah they don’t have eyes.” Dan. suggested that maybe their acorn hats are covering their eyes. Dal. wrote on her evaluation that “I like how the little guys look.” L. shared that she liked when they work together. B. shared that he liked the backgrounds, while E. would have liked more color in the backgrounds. F. liked the cartoon style of The Little Guys. S. shared that “I like this book a lot because if you took away all the words, the picture would still tell the story,” which was a huge revelation for our group – and an essential part of evaluating picture books.

Carl and the Meaning of Life by Deborah Freedman

Carl is an earthworm. He spends his days happily tunneling in the soil until a field mouse asks him a simple question that stops him short: “Why?” Carl’s quest takes him on an adventure to meet all the animals of the forest, each of whom seems to know exactly what they were put on this earth to do, unlike the curious Carl. But it’s not until the world around him has changed that Carl begins to realize that everyone, no matter how small, makes a big difference just by being themselves.

Our group was really impressed by Deborah Freedman’s use of watercolors and colored pencil, which came up throughout our discussion. Da. shared “I can see that it’s made of watercolors because of the background. It’s just like an effective color.”  Several kids remarked on the design of the animals and how much they enjoyed them. S. pointed out that she liked “how the fox looks the same on every page,” which led us to talk about consistency of design as a hallmark of excellence. Mi. shared how she liked how the art bled to the edge of the page, which helped draw us into Carl’s world. K. shared how he appreciated how you could see the grass and dirt – and could see Carl everywhere. Yu. recognized that this book had a lot to teach us. 

Bear Came Along by Richard T. Morris, illustrated by LeUyen Pham 

Once there was a river flowing through a forest. The river didn’t know it was capable of adventures until a big bear came along. But adventures aren’t any fun by yourself, and so enters Froggy, Turtles, Beaver, Racoons, and Duck. These very different animals take off downstream, but they didn’t know they needed one another until thankfully, the river came along.

Em. liked so many things like how the pages are colorful and you’re with the animals on the trip. This led us into a discussion about perspective, which LeUyen Pham does so well. Da. shared, “I can see their mood,” which helped us talk about the characters’ expressions in the art. K. shared, “I like how the turtle is many colors. I like how everything is unordinary. How all the animals hang out together. My favorite thing is how the book literally shows them in the water going fast.” C. shared, “I like how there’s different kinds of trees.” S. ruminated about the drawings, considering how they are nice and simple at the same time, declaring them “simply nice,” which provoked us to think about how art that looks simple took a lot of work to look almost effortless. F. shared that she liked how the pages are full of color with not a lot of white space. K. led us in a close read of the book, compelling us to return to the scene when the animals are at the brink of falling down the waterfall. C. declared that “it’s like VR (virtual reality),” which caused Mi. to add how she liked how the book’s orientation changes as we move forward. S. added that “I like how we can see what they see and we’re in their perspective.” It’s really incredible how kids’ ideas fuel each other’s insights.

Another by Christian Robinson 

A young girl and her cat take an imaginative journey into another world where they discover others like them.

K. instantly made a text-to-text connection to The Other Mother from Coraline, which provoked me to share how Another is also influenced by Alice in Wonderland. Em. shared how “the pictures are up and down. And you know what’s going to happen from future spreads in earlier ones like the colored balls,” leading us to talk about how predictions work in this book. Like Bear Came Along, this book also challenged our ideas of perspective – and took it to the next level. Our group had many questions about the world of the story. Da. shared how he was confused about how the girl woke up to discover the portal. Yu. shared that the light and noise of the portal could have woken her up. She shared that the pictures are very unique, which you don’t see it often, connecting Another to the criteria about books being individually distinct. Mi. shared that she loved the parallel selves scene. Ay. wondered about the imaginary world and how it worked – so we talked about how we had to suspend our disbelief to explore Another. K. offered a pragmatic solution: “Maybe she’s dreaming.” S. noticed that “there’s so much white space,” as a design feature of the story. 

After this book, I put in a movement break where we stretched up and down to get some of our wiggles out. Out of all the changes I made in this program, this was the best way I implemented. Yes, we did pretend to be the little guys reaching for the berry and then toppling over.

When Aidan Became a Brother by Kyle Lukoff, illustrated by Kaylani Juanita 

Aidan, a transgender boy, experiences complicated emotions as he and his parents prepare for the arrival of a new baby.

I started our discussion by sharing a picture of Kyle and Kaylani together. We had the opportunity to host Kyle at our library earlier this fall and he told us he was going to meet Kaylani for the first time – and our Caldecott Club was super invested in this meeting. Sa. liked the details in the art, which I shared was done digitally, although it feels like watercolors. F. shared how she liked “how the text matched the pictures and worked together well. The art gives people more information about what is going on.” We learned from Kyle how he left space for Kaylani to work her illustrator magic – and our kids noticed how effectively she applied her skills to tell this story. Sa. shared that she liked that you don’t find out the gender of the baby or what their name is. K. pointed out how Aidan is holding the baby at the end of the story, which was an effective choice for the final spread. L. shared how she liked the scene where they paint the baby’s room, which is also my favorite spread.

At the Mountain’s Base by Traci Sorell, illustrated by Weshoyot Alvitre

At the mountain’s base sits a cabin under an old hickory tree. And in that cabin lives a family–loving, weaving, cooking, and singing. The strength in their song sustains them through trials on the ground and in the sky, as they wait for their loved one, a pilot, to return from war.

Yu. shared how it’s a good book. She told us how around Veteran’s Day she shared it with her Social Studies teacher who read it to her class who really liked it. This led us to talk about how it’s individually distinct, unlike anything else we’ve read this year. Mi. pointed out how the family was connected to their family member in the plane. She was  curious to know more about Ola Mildred “Millie” Rexcoat, an Oglala Lakota pilot who inspired this book, so we made sure to read selections from the author’s note. 

The group was curious to know more about the airforce building that honored her. I want to make sure I share this information here that the Ellsworth Airfield Operations Building was renamed the “Millie Rexroat Building,” on Oct. 2, 2017. Em. wondered about how when they were praying if they could talk to their loved one. We talked about the family’s connection to their family member and their ancestors. This reminded me of a quote from an Cynsations interview with the author, Traci Sorell, who shared, “I hope [the book] sparks discussions about the contributions that Native people have made that go unnoticed. I also want to uplift how Native Nations honor those active duty military personnel and veterans regardless of how they are treated in the broader United States culture or by its federal government. Similarly, there is no separation between our lives here and the spirit world, all are connected. I love that Weshoyot’s art shows that so beautifully.” Fe. liked how the art zooms in the airplanes and goes closer, using comic panels to express these ideas. She also added “I like how they’re talking about weaving and then we see the airplane on the pattern.” We talked about how Weshoyot did her research about these traditional Cherokee weaving practices. B. shared how he liked the scene with the pilot in the air connected to her ancestors.

My Papi Has a Motorcycle by Isabel Quintero, illustrated by Zeke Peña

When Daisy Ramona zooms around her neighborhood with her papi on his motorcycle, she sees the people and places she’s always known. She also sees a community that is rapidly changing around her.

Fe. began our discussion by sharing, “I like how it’s about love,” which really captured the essence of the theme. Em. liked how the conflict was solved at the end with Daisy Ramona and her family getting raspados. Sa. liked how the art showed the stores with actual names, which helped ground the story in reality. The group enjoyed the sense of movement and action in the pages. 

Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story by Kevin Noble Maillard, illustrated by Juana Martinez-Neal

Told in lively and powerful verse by debut author Kevin Noble Maillard, Fry Bread is an evocative depiction of a modern Native American family, vibrantly illustrated by Pura Belpre Award winner and Caldecott Honoree Juana Martinez-Neal. Fry bread is food. It is warm and delicious, piled high on a plate. Fry bread is time. It brings families together for meals and new memories. Fry bread is nation. It is shared by many, from coast to coast and beyond. Fry bread is us. It is a celebration of old and new, traditional and modern, similarity and difference.

Our group was very curious if Kevin and Juana talked to each other through the process of creating Fry Bread, as we’ve discussed how illustrators don’t often talk to authors. Sam. pointed out how she like how it has details in the characters like the tattoos, which I shared were Seminole symbols tattooed on the wrist.  K. shared that the art made him thoughtful. Our group was increasingly curious about how to make fry bread, which led us to examine the back-matter of the book, including the recipe that Kevin provided. This book definitely sparked our group’s interest in making fry bread, which then provided an important opportunity to talk about authenticity and respect. Our kids would love to invite Kevin to come join us at our library to talk about making Fry Bread, the book and food! This was an important opportunity to talk again about how Native people are here in our community. We all gushed about how much we love the baby in the “Fry Bread is You” spread. 

Saturday by Oge Mora 

When all of their special Saturday plans go awry, Ava and her mother still find a way to appreciate one another and their time together.

Al. shared how Saturday looks like it’s made out of paper, which led us to talk about how it’s made with collages made with acrylic paint, china markers, patterned paper, and old book clippings and then hand-lettered. Em. pointed out that the tickets are on the table at the beginning of the story. Dal. shared how she liked that it was a bit abstract. S. pointed out the effectiveness of the  park scene. C. pointed out how the book is also made of newspaper clippings. Sa. shared how she liked how detailed the book is that is made of words. I’d love to know more about the source material that Oge Mora used to create Saturday myself, which I know has hidden layers we’ve yet to uncover.

The Undefeated by Kwame Alexander and Kadir Nelson 

Originally performed for ESPN’s The Undefeated, this poem is a love letter to black life in the United States. It highlights the unspeakable trauma of slavery, the faith and fire of the civil rights movement, and the grit, passion, and perseverance of some of the world’s greatest heroes. The text is also peppered with references to the words of Martin Luther King, Jr., Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, and others, offering deeper insights into the accomplishments of the past, while bringing stark attention to the endurance and spirit of those surviving and thriving in the present. Robust back matter at the end provides valuable historical context and additional detail for those wishing to learn more.


Sa. immediately pointed out how she liked how Kadir Nelson’s illustrations look realistic, which led us all to obsess about how these oils on panel paintings are extraordinary. L. wondered how Kadir made the pictures look so good. Our special guest, Dr. Roth, responded, “Kadir Nelson is a genius.” Our group was particularly moved by the “The Unspeakable” spread with the cracked photographs. This is a painting of pictures of Addie Mae Collins, Cynthia Westley, Carole Robertson, and Carol Denise Mcnair, the four young girls who were killed in the racially motivated 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham on September 15, 1963. There are so many moments within The Undefeated that readers return to again and again.  K. shared that “this book makes me feel strong.” He shared an illustration to express this feeling. What could be better than kids responding to picture books by making art?

Hair Love by Matthew A. Cherry, illustrated by Vashti Harrison

A little girl’s daddy steps in to help her arrange her curly, coiling, wild hair into styles that allow her to be her natural, beautiful self.

Br. shared that he loved that the dad has cool hair too. Our group really like making connections between the Hair Love short film and the picture book. I’m so glad that we had a chance to watch it during our extra session when we made art based on the picture books. It’s clear they remembered a lot from the film. Bi. shared how everything is not empty in the backgrounds. Fe. shared how it’s related to My Papi has a Motorcycle since it’s about a daughter and father relationship. At the end of the program, Mi. shared with me that she loves that it’s about natural hair.

We had successfully discussed all eleven books and were ready to vote for their top 3 picture books. This was definitely a challenge for many kids who didn’t have one favorite – or had too many favorites. The struggle is real. Once they voted, they were tasked with completing an evaluation. When they completed the evaluation, they each received a prize bag. While I did the math with the ballots, Ms. Gaby and Ms. Lisa ran a raffle with the kids to give away a bunch of swag that Dr. Roth brought for us and some additional merch related to the books we studied. I really appreciate their willingness to help out with the raffle, which was no easy feat – and something I’m definitely changing for the future Caldecott Club since it made it a bit too chaotic at the end. But kids do so love prizes…

Finally, the math was complete and we were ready to announce our winners!

The Winner of our 2019 Mock Caldecott is….

The Little Guys by Vera Brosgol!

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The moment we revealed the winner…

Our Honor Books are:

Bear Came Along by Richard T. Morris, illustrated by LeUyen Pham 

When Aidan Became a Brother by Kyle Lukoff, illustrated by Kaylani Juanita 

My Papi Has a Motorcycle by Isabel Quintero, illustrated by Zeke Peña 

Hair Love by Matthew A. Cherry, illustrated by Vashti Harrison

Finally, our group received their well-deserved CaldeCookies as a delicious treat for their hard work!

Our group created this video to “make the call” to let Vera Brosgol know that they had chosen her book as our Mock Caldecott winner.

But wait, there’s more!

Please join us for our Caldecott Club Viewing Party at the library of the webcast of the American Library Association’s Youth Media Awards on Monday, January 27 at 3:30pm, including the Newbery, Caldecott and Coretta Scott King Book Awards. We’ll provide predictions, refreshments, and raffle off Beekle and a signed copy of When Aidan Became a Brother! Everyone will receive a free 2019 Caldecott Award poster donated by Baker & Taylor. You can watch the webcast live that morning at 7am CST – but please keep the secrets before our group gets together.

Did you miss any of our sessions? Curious what happens in Caldecott Club? Want to know the brilliant things our kids said? Check out our recaps of each of the previous sessions!


Caldecott Club Session 1

Caldecott Club Session 2

Caldecott Club Session 3

Caldecott Club Session 4

Caldecott Club Session 5




Exploration Station Activities: Magnets

Posted & filed under Blog, Early Literacy, Uncategorized, Youth & Teen.

For our first exploration station of the new year, we looked at all the different things magnets can do! We did three activities after going over what a magnet is, focusing on what things are magnetic, and what they are.

Our first activity was Magnetic Sensory Painting. We used a paper plate, paper clips, magnet wands and paint. Using a magnet underneath the plate, kids could drag the paper clips to paint their own masterpiece!

Magnet Sensory Paintings
Magnet Sensory Painting

Our second activity was DIY magnets. Kids cut out letters, pictures, and used paper magnets to explore how they can use magnets in their own everyday life.

DIY Mangets

Our last activity was a magnet Sensory Bin, which is all about figuring out what is magnetic and what is not! Kids dug and explored through a bin to find the magnetic items and sorted them between magnetic and non-magnetic. This gave kids hands-on experience to deepen their understanding of magnetism, as well as promoted classification and sorting, an early math skill. What activities will we do next week? Visit us on Thursdays at 11:30am to find out!

Caldecott Club #6

Posted & filed under Blog, Youth & Teen.

Hi! I’m Miss Eti, one of the Youth & Teen Services librarians and I’m back with another recap of our latest Caldecott Club session. We had our 6th session on Thursday, December 19th, which was a special additional session to focus more on what the kids wanted to do. From the beginning they have been fascinated by the grown-up committee and what they do to select the most distinguished picture book for children, given out each year by the Association for Library Service to Children. So I reach out to my colleague, librarian Sarah Bean Thompson, a member of the 2016 Caldecott Committee, who graciously agreed to Skype with our group. Last session I had the kids share questions they had for her and then Sarah did her best to answer all of their pressing questions. Well, the questions that she could answer. D. was pretty fascinated with the fact that secrets were being shared – but Sarah was clear about what she could tell him – and what she couldn’t…

Sarah shared a presentation she created about her experiences
on the Caldecott committee.

Sarah shared her fascinating process of serving on the 2016 Caldecott committee. She shared the meeting process for the Caldecott Committee, with a practice discussion in June 2015. She then told us how they submit 3 sets of nominations with a total of 7 nominations each (like book reports) from the around 800 picture books they read. They then met in a room in January 2016 for three days pretty much nonstop discussing the books they had nominated. Sarah showed us the boxes that publishers sent to her, like the box we open at the beginning of each session. She shared how she had books everywhere in her house. Sarah shared how it was a lot of work – but also a lot of fun. She talked about how the committee was very respectful and kind and listened to each other to choose all of the books together. Once they chose the book, they had to keep the secret until they made the call to the illustrators on the Monday of the press conference. She showed us a video of the committee making the call and cheering. She also showed us a video from Sophie Blackall reacting to the news and spotlighting other Caldecott clubs. 

We could feel Sarah’s passion and enthusiasm for this experience, as she said, “It was an amazing – one of the coolest things I’ve ever done as a librarian.” Our kids were very curious about Sarah would take on this huge responsibility. She explained, “When you are a librarian and love books as much as you do, being on the committee is one of the top things you can do, a once in a lifetime opportunity, to give back to the world of children’s books and make a lasting impression.” Sarah also validated the fantastic work we’ve been doing in our program. She told us that she’s read the kids’ comments in our blog posts, and our discussions are just like the grown-up committee – as we find a book that rises to the top. She told us that one of the cool things about the Caldecott committee was that many of the people had Caldecott clubs and take the feedback from the kids and share what they said. Sarah encouraged us to share our feedback with people on the committee now. After all, “It’s all about what the kids want.” Sarah then turned the questions on our group, asking them what books stand out to them. Mi. declared her support for Hair Love. M. told us she loved The Little Guys. Al. told us she liked Carl and the Meaning of Life. Ya. praised The Undefeated. D. shared a whole list of books. Our challenge will truly be to determine which of our 11 fabulous books is the one that we think is the best picture book of 2019. Thankfully, with Sarah’s insights and knowledge in our minds, we will certainly come to consensus together. We are all so grateful to Sarah for joining our program and sharing her experiences with us. It was truly wonderful to learn more about the behind-the-scenes process of book evaluation!

Learn more in the Horn Book article, “And now, a word from the “Real” Committee” by Martha V. Parravano

Since this session was all about what the kids wanted to do, we then turned our attention from evaluating art to making art. From the beginning, they have expressed an interest in making their own pieces inspired by the styles in the books we studied. I set up several stations with materials based on the books, with directions to use them to create their own versions of the book covers. I had colored paper, painted paper, discarded books, and textured paper at stations inspired by Saturday by Oge Mora and Another by Christian Robinson. I provided yarn, glue and watercolors for a station inspired by At the Mountain’s Base by Traci Sorell and Weshoyot Alvitre. I provided watercolors, colored pencils and crayons for a station inspired by When Aidan Became a Brother by Kyle Lukoff and Kaylani Juanita. (While this book was done digitally, it feels like watercolors….) Interestingly, all of the kids were eager to play and explore using watercolors, moving around the different tables and using the materials to create their own art. The kids made this activity their own, which is what this is all about! While we made the art, we finally watched the Hair Love short film.

Here’s some of the wonderful art they made:

We ended our program by making short video trailers for each of the books. If you’re interested in helping make our Caldecott party video, feel free to contact me! 

We actually did not have time to review all of the books going to the party. So, if anyone missed a session or wants to refresh their memory of the books we’ve discussed, you can visit our Caldecott Club display in the library and explore the books. They are reference only but you can put any of the books on hold here

The books going to the party are:

The Little Guys by Vera Brosgol

Carl and the Meaning of Life by Deborah Freedman

Bear Came Along by Richard T. Morris, illustrated by LeUyen Pham

Another by Christian Robinson 

When Aidan Became a Brother by Kyle Lukof, illustrated by Kaylani Juanita 

At the Mountain’s Base by Traci Sorell, illustrated by Weshoyot Alvitre

My Papi Has a Motorcycle by Isabel Quintero, illustrated by Zeke Peña

Fry Bread: A Native American Family Story by Kevin Noble Maillard, illustrated by Juana Martinez-Neal

Saturday by Oge Mora 

The Undefeated by Kwame Alexander, illustrated by Kadir Nelson  

Hair Love by Matthew A. Cherry, illustrated by Vashti Harrison

Please join us on January 9 from 3:30-5:00 for our Caldecott Club Voting Party where we select the best picture book of 2019. Snacks – and Caldecookies – will be provided!

Did you miss any of our sessions? Curious what happens in Caldecott Club? Want to know the brilliant things our kids said? Check out our recaps of each of the previous sessions!

Caldecott Club Session 1

Caldecott Club Session 2

Caldecott Club Session 3

Caldecott Club Session 4

Caldecott Club Session 5

Early Literacy Activities: Exploring Textures and Senses

Posted & filed under Blog, Early Literacy, Uncategorized.

At our weekly Exploration Station: STEAM Play, which takes place every Thursday at 11:30am, we looked at textures and senses. We read a touch, play, and feel book about Food, which got kids excited about different feelings. It was a great way to get kids excited about the theme, and understand it, as so many kids explore food on a daily basis.

Our first activity was “Touch Painting.” Kids put on blindfolds. By taking away the sense of sight, kids could focus on the sense of feel (and touch), by painting. Kids were shocked at the new sensations, even though they had painted before. They were also surprised at what they could create without using sight.

Touch Painting

The second activity was called “What’s Inside?” Kids played with a bunch of different materials. We gave them a sheet with lots of different feel and texture words to help encourage them to describe the feelings they were experiencing. They then used blindfolds again to reach into the bags and see if they could identify the items in the bag, again using both senses and textures, as well as putting their vocabulary to use. Kids loved seeing the contrast between all of the different materials, and were excited to see how good their identification and explanation was throughout the game. Both activities kept kids coming back. We hope to see you there on Thursdays for new themes!

What’s Inside?

Program Review: Books & Bites with Author Shane Burcaw

Posted & filed under Blog, Youth & Teen.

Our library was lucky enough to talk with Shane Burcaw for a special edition of Books & Bites. We talked about his children’s book Not So Different: What You Really Wanted to Ask About Having A Disability. We also talked about his popular YouTube Chanel with his fiancé Hannah (Squirmy and Grubs). We discussed his disability (spinal muscular atrophy), as well as his purpose in writing his 3 books, popular blog (Laughing at my Nightmare), and YouTube channel, to demonstrate how normal his life is and how you can overcome obstacles with your attitude and humor. Everyone was able to get a good understanding of who he was and some of the basics before we spoke to him, and were able to use that discussion to write down excellent questions for him when he spoke to us.

Shane spoke to us about a lot of things. First, he spoke about the basics of his life. He also touched on his writing process, some things that are unique about his life, as well as common misconceptions and challenges that he deals with when talking with people, buying a house, and even eating food. Kids asked him formal questions about his book, but also about his personality and everyday life. In this way, they were able to get a full and comprehensive understanding of Shane during the discussion and Q&A session. Because his books are so intertwined with his life, he was a perfect person to have an author visit, and kids were able to access his work to a much larger degree than if they hadn’t talked to him.

Be sure to check out Shane’s writing and content here, and stay tuned for more program updates! 

Not So Different

Laughing At My Nightmare

People Assume My Girlfriend is My Nurse

Laughing At My Nightmare – BLOG